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Balmer and Lyman Wavelengths

Posted: Thu Oct 19, 2017 10:47 pm
by RuchaDeshpande1L
In the textbook, atomic spectroscopy was said to often result in spectral lines, some of which are grouped into specific series. For example, the Balmer series wavelengths represent visible light (electrons jump down to n=2) and the Lyman series wavelengths represent UV light (n=1). If in a problem we are told that UV light is produced from an electron transition, will it always be part of the Lyman series with a final n of 1? Or are there exceptions to these series?

Re: Balmer and Lyman Wavelengths

Posted: Thu Oct 19, 2017 10:51 pm
by miznaakbar
One of the homework questions said UV light was released from a transition, and it implied that it was a Lyman series (meaning it jumped down to n=1). Using n=1, I got the right answer so I assume that there are no exceptions considering the question expected you to know UV meant Lyman.

Re: Balmer and Lyman Wavelengths

Posted: Thu Oct 19, 2017 10:52 pm
by Chem_Mod
If the problem tells you that UV light is produced you should assume it was a transition to n=1 energy level. There are no exceptions to be considered :)

Re: Balmer and Lyman Wavelengths  [ENDORSED]

Posted: Thu Oct 19, 2017 10:55 pm
by miznaakbar
^Looks like we're all on the same wavelength then

Re: Balmer and Lyman Wavelengths

Posted: Mon Oct 23, 2017 10:59 am
by Emma Miltenberger 2I
There are no exceptions to this as far as I am aware. The Balmer series represent all of the spectral lines within the visible spectrum and the Lyman series represents all of the spectral lines within the UV region of the spectrum. Therefore, for each transition to n=2 and n=1 respectively, is part of the Balmer or Lyman series.