Wavelength Worked Example from Lecture

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Cecilia Jardon 1I
Posts: 74
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:16 am

Wavelength Worked Example from Lecture

Postby Cecilia Jardon 1I » Fri Oct 12, 2018 2:46 pm

Worked Example: If you are driving a 1.50 x 10 ^(3) car at 27.0 m(s^-1). What is the De Broglie wavelength of your car? Does your car have any measurable wavelength properties?
wavelength= h/p = -h/mv = (6.626 x 10 ^ (-34) J(s)) / ( 1.50 X 10 ^3 kg) (27.0 m(s^-1)) = 1.64 x 10 ^ (-38) m
In the lecture, the professor mentioned how this wavelength is not detectable. I was not able to catch why the reason was to that. Can someone explain, please.

Helen Mejia 1I
Posts: 67
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:24 am

Re: Wavelength Worked Example from Lecture

Postby Helen Mejia 1I » Fri Oct 12, 2018 2:48 pm

I recall that the professor said that the smallest wavelength is 10^-18. Anything smaller such as 10^-38 is too small to be detected

MinaChoi_3H
Posts: 31
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:25 am

Re: Wavelength Worked Example from Lecture

Postby MinaChoi_3H » Fri Oct 12, 2018 2:50 pm

1.64 x 10^-38m is an EXTREMELY small wavelength. This would require very advanced and sensitive technology to detect such a small wavelength, but to measure something like that is currently impossible. We can measure small wavelengths but anything 10^-38 is so minute and indistinguishable we are unable to detect it.

MaggieMatern_Dis1H
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:19 am

Re: Wavelength Worked Example from Lecture

Postby MaggieMatern_Dis1H » Fri Oct 12, 2018 4:17 pm

This wavelength is not detectable because it is so small (10^-34). This is logical because when you observe a car in real life, it does not display wavelike properties. Extremely small particles, like electrons, do exhibit wavelike properties, and therefore their wavelength tends to be larger.


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