Rydberg equation  [ENDORSED]

H-Atom ()

Moderators: Chem_Mod, Chem_Admin

KHowe_1B
Posts: 33
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:15 am

Rydberg equation

Postby KHowe_1B » Sat Oct 05, 2019 2:10 pm

What exactly is the Rydberg equation and how do you know when to use it?

Chem_Mod
Posts: 17659
Joined: Thu Aug 04, 2011 1:53 pm
Has upvoted: 404 times

Re: Rydberg equation  [ENDORSED]

Postby Chem_Mod » Sat Oct 05, 2019 2:29 pm

In class I will cover this topic in detail using more fundamental concepts to solve problems (and not directly using the Rydberg equation).

Jessa Maheras 4F
Posts: 16
Joined: Fri Aug 02, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby Jessa Maheras 4F » Sat Oct 05, 2019 6:44 pm

The Rydberg equation is used in to find the wavelength of light emitted when an electron moves between energy levels. This one of the concepts covered under the quantum mechanics of the atom.

Lauren Tindall
Posts: 15
Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby Lauren Tindall » Sun Oct 06, 2019 3:25 pm

The Rydberg formula, by definition, is a mathematical formula which predicts the wavelength of light coming from an electron moving between energy levels of an atom according to the science website, ThoughtCo.

AnayaArnold_3L
Posts: 30
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:19 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby AnayaArnold_3L » Sun Oct 06, 2019 6:14 pm

KHowe_1B wrote:What exactly is the Rydberg equation and how do you know when to use it?


You usually use igt in place of a constant when trying to calculate wavelength or frequency!

Tauhid Islam- 1F
Posts: 11
Joined: Fri Aug 02, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby Tauhid Islam- 1F » Sun Oct 06, 2019 6:25 pm

Jessa Maheras 4F wrote:The Rydberg equation is used in to find the wavelength of light emitted when an electron moves between energy levels. This one of the concepts covered under the quantum mechanics of the atom.


is the equation just for when an electron is moving from a higher energy level to a lower energy level, thus finding the frequency of a photon that is emitted? or can it also be used for when an electron is moving from a lower energy level to a higher energy level, (finding the frequency of a photon that is absorbed)? is absorbed even the correct term?

KatherineValdez_4B
Posts: 22
Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby KatherineValdez_4B » Mon Oct 07, 2019 12:04 am

Thank you for asking, I thought I was the only one that didn't know.

805097738
Posts: 57
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:20 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby 805097738 » Mon Oct 07, 2019 7:31 am

to clarify, is this the speed of light= frequency * wavelength equation? if so it would be used to determine the value of one of those if given the other two.

Brittany Tran 3I
Posts: 30
Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby Brittany Tran 3I » Tue Oct 08, 2019 5:56 pm

that's a different equation. the rydberg equation can be used to calculate wavelength or frequency of an electron when it moves to a different energy level

BeylemZ-4A
Posts: 28
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby BeylemZ-4A » Wed Oct 09, 2019 3:12 pm

The rydberg equation, if i am correct, is derived from Bohr's equation. Dr. Lavelle prefers to use Bohr's over the Rydberg equation though.

Ziyan Wang 3J
Posts: 32
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:22 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby Ziyan Wang 3J » Thu Oct 10, 2019 11:52 am

Rydberg equation states that the energy of energy levels equals to hR/n^2 (n=1,2,3...), h is planck constant(6.63*10^-34 Js), R is Rydberg constant (3.29*10^15 Hz)

BCaballero_3A
Posts: 34
Joined: Wed Nov 14, 2018 12:22 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby BCaballero_3A » Thu Oct 10, 2019 3:09 pm

You would use the Rydberg equation to calculate the wavelength of light when an electron moves energy levels.

MAC 1G
Posts: 45
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby MAC 1G » Thu Oct 10, 2019 3:43 pm

The Rydberg formula is a mathematical formula used to predict the wavelength of light resulting from an electron moving between energy levels of an atom. Rydberg's findings were combined with Bohr's model in which he found 1/λ = RZ2(1/n12 - 1/n22) where:
λ is the wavelength of the photon (wavenumber = 1/wavelength)
R = Rydberg's constant (1.0973731568539(55) x 107 m-1)
Z = atomic number of the atom
n1 and n2 are integers where n2 > n1.

Here's a video that explains it a little more in depth: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4kOdbqoycmY

rachel liu 3k
Posts: 34
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby rachel liu 3k » Thu Oct 10, 2019 7:20 pm

In class, Professor Lavelle wrote the Rydberg equation with a negative sign on the right to show that energy was being lost. Unfortunately when I used the equation that way, my negatives got all messed up and my answer was wrong...Should I just forget that negative?

905289082
Posts: 31
Joined: Fri Aug 09, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby 905289082 » Fri Oct 11, 2019 9:04 am

When is an example of when you would use the Rydberg equation?

erica thompson 4I
Posts: 32
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:21 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby erica thompson 4I » Fri Oct 11, 2019 1:45 pm

Can someone clarify why the Rydberg equation is always negative? Because you're "losing" energy because it's being transferred somewhere else?

chrischyu4a
Posts: 32
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby chrischyu4a » Fri Oct 11, 2019 3:27 pm

erica thompson 4I wrote:Can someone clarify why the Rydberg equation is always negative? Because you're "losing" energy because it's being transferred somewhere else?

The Rydberg equation is negative because it is comparing the energy difference between the two levels the electrons transitioned between. When an electron transitions from a higher energy level to a lower one, it loses energy which explains the negative sign.

chrischyu4a
Posts: 32
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby chrischyu4a » Fri Oct 11, 2019 3:28 pm

erica thompson 4I wrote:Can someone clarify why the Rydberg equation is always negative? Because you're "losing" energy because it's being transferred somewhere else?

The Rydberg equation is negative because it is comparing the energy difference between the two levels the electrons transitioned between. When an electron transitions from a higher energy level to a lower one, it loses energy which explains the negative sign.

melinak1
Posts: 25
Joined: Tue Sep 24, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby melinak1 » Fri Oct 11, 2019 4:19 pm

are the final units wirtten in Hz or Js?

Sean Cheah 3B
Posts: 31
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:20 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby Sean Cheah 3B » Sat Oct 12, 2019 12:21 pm

rachel liu 3k wrote:In class, Professor Lavelle wrote the Rydberg equation with a negative sign on the right to show that energy was being lost. Unfortunately when I used the equation that way, my negatives got all messed up and my answer was wrong...Should I just forget that negative?

When using the Rydberg formula, the order of your two principal quantum numbers (the two n's that represent the energy levels between which the electron is traveling) is very important. The equation the formula Lavelle wrote on the board (with a negative sign) places the final principal quantum number before the initial, which is, in a way, quite intuitive because many chemistry formulas contain this motif of final minus initial. By contrast, the formula posted by MAC 1A above (without the negative sign) places the initial principal before the final, essentially distributing the negative sign. This confusing detail is likely the main reason Lavelle encouraged us to use the difference of two Bohr equations rather than the plug-and-chug Rydberg formula.

Megan_1F
Posts: 29
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby Megan_1F » Sat Oct 12, 2019 12:24 pm

Can someone please tell me which units cancel out when solving the Rydberg equation?

Sean Cheah 3B
Posts: 31
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:20 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby Sean Cheah 3B » Sat Oct 12, 2019 12:29 pm

melinak1 wrote:are the final units wirtten in Hz or Js?

This depends on what the question is asking for. The traditional form of the Rydberg formula, as posted by MAC 1G above, allows you to plug in constants on the left side to get 1 over the wavelength of the photon that will be emitted/absorbed when an electron transitions between the energy levels represented by your principal quantum numbers. If the problem you are attempting to solve only asks for the wavelength, you can simply take the reciprocal of whatever you get on the right side to get an answer in m (which you would then most likely convert to nm for convenience). On the other hand, a more complicated problem could ask for the frequency of the emitted light or even the energy of the photon. In those cases, you would use and/or as needed, and your final answer would be in Hz or Joules, respectively.
Last edited by Sean Cheah 3B on Sat Oct 12, 2019 12:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Sean Cheah 3B
Posts: 31
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:20 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby Sean Cheah 3B » Sat Oct 12, 2019 12:33 pm

Megan_1F wrote:Can someone please tell me which units cancel out when solving the Rydberg equation?

The principal quantum numbers (the n's) have no units. The Rydberg constant has the units . Basically, everything on the right side will work out to some answer with the units . This matches the left side as 1 over the frequency would naturally also have the units . There's really no cancelling of units happening at all in this formula AFAIK.

MaggieHan3D
Posts: 31
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby MaggieHan3D » Sat Oct 12, 2019 12:54 pm

The rydberg equation I think is just an equation that combines a few steps of the Einitial - Efinal method.

Anvi Brahmbhatt 4A
Posts: 30
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:21 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby Anvi Brahmbhatt 4A » Sat Oct 12, 2019 2:57 pm

MAC 1G wrote:The Rydberg formula is a mathematical formula used to predict the wavelength of light resulting from an electron moving between energy levels of an atom. Rydberg's findings were combined with Bohr's model in which he found 1/λ = RZ2(1/n12 - 1/n22) where:
λ is the wavelength of the photon (wavenumber = 1/wavelength)
R = Rydberg's constant (1.0973731568539(55) x 107 m-1)
Z = atomic number of the atom
n1 and n2 are integers where n2 > n1.

Here's a video that explains it a little more in depth: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4kOdbqoycmY


Thank you for this! I'll definitely check this video out.

Catherine Daye 1H
Posts: 30
Joined: Wed Sep 11, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby Catherine Daye 1H » Sat Oct 12, 2019 4:16 pm

You use the Rydberg equation to calculate the wavelength of light released when an electron jumps down to lower energy levels.

Tauhid Islam- 1F
Posts: 11
Joined: Fri Aug 02, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby Tauhid Islam- 1F » Sat Oct 12, 2019 7:13 pm

What does the Energy value that we calculate in the Rydberg's Equation represent? The energy of the emitted EMR? or the energy (gained or lost) of the electron as it is moving between discreet energy levels? Or is it the same?

Emma Joy Schaetz 1E
Posts: 24
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby Emma Joy Schaetz 1E » Sun Oct 13, 2019 1:49 am

Can someone help me understand why we use the Rydberg equation?

CarolCao4F
Posts: 5
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:22 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby CarolCao4F » Sun Oct 13, 2019 2:15 am

Tauhid Islam- 1F wrote:What does the Energy value that we calculate in the Rydberg's Equation represent? The energy of the emitted EMR? or the energy (gained or lost) of the electron as it is moving between discreet energy levels? Or is it the same?


I believe the energy value calculated in the Rydberg's Equation represents the energy of the electron at a specific energy level. To find the energy gained or lost of the electron as it moves between quantum levels, you use the Rydberg Equation to find the energy of the electron at the initial quantum level and then the energy of the electron at the final quantum level. Then, you simply find the change in E = E(initial) - E (final).

CarolCao4F
Posts: 5
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:22 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby CarolCao4F » Sun Oct 13, 2019 2:22 am

Emma Joy Schaetz 1E wrote:Can someone help me understand why we use the Rydberg equation?


The Rydberg equation is used to calculate the energy of an electron at a certain principle quantum level of an atom. We'll usually use it in problems where we're asked to calculate the change in energy, frequency, or velocity that occurs when an electron moves from on quantum level to another. For the example Lavelle showed in class,

"ex. Calculate the frequency of light emitted by a hydrogen atom when an electron makes a transition from the fourth to the second principle quantum level"

we used the Rydberg equation to calculate first the change in energy from the electron moving from the fourth to the second principle quantum level before using the equation E=hv to calculate the frequency of light emitted when this transition occurred.

[E= (-hR)/(n^2), n =4] - [E= (-hR)/(n^2), n = 2] = change in energy of the electron

Madeline Phan 4H
Posts: 32
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:18 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby Madeline Phan 4H » Sun Oct 13, 2019 8:56 am

The Rydberg equation is found in our textbook and is used to calculate the wavelength of any spectral line in many chemical elements. However, Dr. Lavelle taught us a different approach in class because the Rydberg equation does not really show us why everything is solved the way it is.

kevinolvera1j
Posts: 32
Joined: Fri Aug 02, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby kevinolvera1j » Sun Oct 13, 2019 1:21 pm

The rydberg constant is 3.29x10^15 hz when solving for frequency while in other equations it appears as 1.097x10^-7m in other equations. It's important to use the right version of the constant depending on what you are solving for.

KatherineValdez_4B
Posts: 22
Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby KatherineValdez_4B » Sun Oct 13, 2019 7:05 pm

What units is the final answer in for Rydberg’s equation?

Rosa Munoz 4D
Posts: 38
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:21 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby Rosa Munoz 4D » Sun Oct 13, 2019 8:33 pm

Now I am confused... in the textbook R is positive.

Eesha Chattopadhyay 1K
Posts: 32
Joined: Fri Aug 09, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby Eesha Chattopadhyay 1K » Sun Oct 13, 2019 9:14 pm

The Rydberg equation represents the frequency associated with an electron moving from one energy level to another. The frequency is equal to the Rydberg constant multiplied by the inverse of the final minus initial energy levels. You can use the equation when trying to find the frequency of the wavelength associated with the change in energy levels of the electron.

Sears 4A
Posts: 17
Joined: Tue Feb 05, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby Sears 4A » Sun Oct 13, 2019 9:47 pm

KHowe_1B wrote:What exactly is the Rydberg equation and how do you know when to use it?


Dr. Lavelle said he does not expect us to memorize the Rydberg equation since it is such a shortcut, but would rather us understand the steps to how the equation was made in the first place to solve problems.

TheresaDsilva4A
Posts: 32
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby TheresaDsilva4A » Sun Oct 13, 2019 10:14 pm

The final units of your answer depend on what you are solving for. The principal energy levels (n1 and n2) do not have units. However, if you are solving for the wavelength using the Rydberg equation, the final units of your answer must be meters (or some other measurement of length). For reference, the Rydberg constant in the equation has units m^-1.

Giselle Littleton 3K
Posts: 22
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:20 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby Giselle Littleton 3K » Sun Oct 13, 2019 10:18 pm

The Rydberg equation is used to find the wavelength of light as it is absorbed or emitted, and electrons move between energy levels.

Ruth Glauber 3L
Posts: 31
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:20 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby Ruth Glauber 3L » Sun Oct 13, 2019 10:58 pm

Where does the name Rydberg come from?

205389184
Posts: 24
Joined: Sat Sep 07, 2019 12:18 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby 205389184 » Sun Oct 13, 2019 11:22 pm

If we are given a problem where we must calculate ΔE using empirical equation for a hydrogen atom, must we memorize Rydberg’s constant or can we determine the answer by other means?

Jillian C 4C
Posts: 36
Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby Jillian C 4C » Mon Oct 14, 2019 2:06 am

The Rydberg equation is 1/λ = RZ2(1/n1^2 - 1/n2^2), with R=Rydberg constant and Z=atomic number of the atom. This is used to find the light's wavelength of an electron moving through different energy levels.

Bita Ghanei 1F
Posts: 42
Joined: Thu Feb 28, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby Bita Ghanei 1F » Tue Oct 15, 2019 4:09 pm

Will we ever have to square root n to find the value for an energy state?

Grecia Velasco 4D
Posts: 32
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby Grecia Velasco 4D » Wed Oct 16, 2019 10:37 am

Ruth Glauber 3L wrote:Where does the name Rydberg come from?


It's named after the Swedish scientist Johannes Rydberg.

TimVintsDis3C
Posts: 30
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby TimVintsDis3C » Sat Oct 19, 2019 7:34 pm

Are all of these equations meant to be memorized, or will they be provided on tests?

ATingin_3I
Posts: 32
Joined: Fri Aug 30, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby ATingin_3I » Sat Oct 19, 2019 11:41 pm

chrischyu4a wrote:
erica thompson 4I wrote:Can someone clarify why the Rydberg equation is always negative? Because you're "losing" energy because it's being transferred somewhere else?

The Rydberg equation is negative because it is comparing the energy difference between the two levels the electrons transitioned between. When an electron transitions from a higher energy level to a lower one, it loses energy which explains the negative sign.


what about when an electron transitions from a lower to higher on? Would energy be positive because energy is being absorbed to advance levels?

AnayaArnold_3L
Posts: 30
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:19 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby AnayaArnold_3L » Sun Oct 20, 2019 8:19 pm

KHowe_1B wrote:What exactly is the Rydberg equation and how do you know when to use it?


From what I can tell you will mostly use it whenever frequency is involved in the problem.

Quynh Vo
Posts: 25
Joined: Sun Sep 29, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby Quynh Vo » Sun Oct 20, 2019 8:28 pm

You can use the Rydberg's formula to when you want to calculate the wavelength of radiation when it transitions from different shell levels.

Naomi 3G
Posts: 9
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:20 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby Naomi 3G » Sun Oct 20, 2019 9:30 pm

erica thompson 4I wrote:Can someone clarify why the Rydberg equation is always negative? Because you're "losing" energy because it's being transferred somewhere else?


The Rydberg equation is negative because it is looking at the change in energy when you go from a high state to a lower state. If you are going from energy in state 4 to energy in state 2, the energy in state 2 is going to be negative in reference to the energy in state 4.

Ian Morris 3C
Posts: 30
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:18 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby Ian Morris 3C » Sun Oct 20, 2019 10:45 pm

TimVintsDis3C wrote:Are all of these equations meant to be memorized, or will they be provided on tests?


Most equations are on the reference sheet on the test. That being said it does not hurt to memorize or at least be very familiar with them.

Althea Zhao 1B
Posts: 31
Joined: Mon Jun 17, 2019 7:24 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby Althea Zhao 1B » Mon Oct 21, 2019 5:17 pm

Do we need to understand how the Rydberg equation for other 1-electron ions, -[(Z^2)hR]/n^2 is derived, or can we just apply it?

Angela Prince 3B
Posts: 30
Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby Angela Prince 3B » Thu Oct 24, 2019 12:14 pm

i understand why the first equation prof. lavelle showed us is negative (-hR/n^2). when he derived the second equation (-R[1/n1^2-1/n2^2]) he kept the negative in front but my TA showed that equation as positive. Which is correct?

705198479
Posts: 14
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:20 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby 705198479 » Thu Oct 24, 2019 1:41 pm

is there different ways to write the Rydberg equation ? if so which is the most used one

Lizette Noriega 1H
Posts: 32
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby Lizette Noriega 1H » Thu Oct 24, 2019 5:03 pm

In what kinds of scenarios or questions would we need to use the Rydberg equation?

005384106
Posts: 21
Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby 005384106 » Fri Oct 25, 2019 12:28 pm

I have seen different equations for solving problems about electrons moving to different energy levels using the Rydberg equation and I was wondering what is the correct value of R?

005384106
Posts: 21
Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby 005384106 » Fri Oct 25, 2019 12:30 pm

Lizette Noriega 1H wrote:In what kinds of scenarios or questions would we need to use the Rydberg equation?


You use the Rydberg equation in scenarios where electrons are moving to different energy levels, or for solving the amount of energy is present on an energy level. Both scenarios are different equations using the R unit.

ShreyaKannan1B
Posts: 31
Joined: Wed Sep 11, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby ShreyaKannan1B » Sun Oct 27, 2019 4:37 pm

Is there any problem where you would use Rydberg with another equation?

005162902
Posts: 39
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby 005162902 » Mon Oct 28, 2019 11:24 am

KHowe_1B wrote:What exactly is the Rydberg equation and how do you know when to use it?


used to measure the wavelength of light emited when an electron moves from one energy level to the next. Energy of the electron changes when it jumps levels so this equation accounts for that.

Angela Prince 3B
Posts: 30
Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby Angela Prince 3B » Thu Oct 31, 2019 6:14 pm

ShreyaKannan1B wrote:Is there any problem where you would use Rydberg with another equation?


from my understanding, you would only use the Rydberg EQ when you are looking for the change in energy when an electron moves from one energy level to another.

ShreyaKannan1B
Posts: 31
Joined: Wed Sep 11, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby ShreyaKannan1B » Sun Nov 03, 2019 4:46 pm

TimVintsDis3C wrote:Are all of these equations meant to be memorized, or will they be provided on tests?


Rydberg's constant is provided, but the eqn isn't. However, I think you can use E(lowercase n) = -hR/n^2 which is on the constants sheet.

Ethan Low 1L
Posts: 24
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby Ethan Low 1L » Sun Nov 03, 2019 11:46 pm

To what extent do we need to memorize this?

Mitchell Koss 4G
Posts: 42
Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby Mitchell Koss 4G » Mon Nov 04, 2019 3:40 pm

Equations will be given on any test. Although the traditional Rydberg equation may not be, but Dr. Lavelle’s preferred Rydberg equ is.

Anisha Chandra 4H
Posts: 34
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby Anisha Chandra 4H » Tue Nov 05, 2019 7:43 am

For anyone confused about how the negative sign comes into play, you basically use the Rydberg equation to do Efinal - Einitial. So if an electron was going from n=1 to n=3, you'd do: -hR/9 - -hR/1
This would become positive, which makes sense because the electron is gaining energy.

Katherine Brenner 3H
Posts: 48
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:18 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby Katherine Brenner 3H » Tue Nov 05, 2019 10:27 pm

I would just watch the video module on our class website for this. It is about 1 hr long but super helpful in understanding how to do the calculations and understanding of the concept as well.

Arianna Perea 3H
Posts: 30
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby Arianna Perea 3H » Sat Nov 09, 2019 2:18 pm

Since there are different Rydberg equations, does it matter which equation is used or do you have to use a certain one?

Tiffany Vo 3G
Posts: 31
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby Tiffany Vo 3G » Sat Nov 09, 2019 3:18 pm

I don't think it really matters so long as you get the right answer, but I think Dr. Lavelle prefers that we use the one he taught in class because it allows us to conceptually understand what's occurring. Using his equation might also guarantee partial credit if you get part of the problem wrong, but I'd use whatever equation you're most comfortable using.

Tiffany Vo 3G
Posts: 31
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby Tiffany Vo 3G » Sat Nov 09, 2019 3:18 pm

I don't think it really matters so long as you get the right answer, but I think Dr. Lavelle prefers that we use the one he taught in class because it allows us to conceptually understand what's occurring. Using his equation might also guarantee partial credit if you get part of the problem wrong, but I'd use whatever equation you're most comfortable using.

lasarro
Posts: 33
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby lasarro » Mon Nov 11, 2019 12:46 pm

The Ryberg equation measures energy levels

AnayaArnold_3L
Posts: 30
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:19 am

Re: Rydberg equation

Postby AnayaArnold_3L » Mon Nov 11, 2019 7:37 pm

As long as you know the equations name and how to use it you should be fine!


Return to “Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest