Unit keV

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Michael Du 1E
Posts: 117
Joined: Sun Sep 22, 2019 12:16 am

Unit keV

Postby Michael Du 1E » Mon Oct 14, 2019 9:49 pm

What does the unit keV stand for? Saw this unit on problem B5, did Professor Lavelle ever introduce this in the lectures?

Baoying Li 1B
Posts: 113
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:18 am

Re: Unit keV

Postby Baoying Li 1B » Mon Oct 14, 2019 10:04 pm

In the unit "keV", "k" stands for kilo(10^3) and "eV" stands for electron volt, a unit of energy equal to the energy acquired by an electron in being accelerated through a potential difference of 1 volt. Therefore, "keV" is kilo-electron volt. For problem 1B5, you will need to convert "keV" to "J". 1 eV = 1.602 x 10^-19J

Brynne Burrows 3K
Posts: 52
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Unit keV

Postby Brynne Burrows 3K » Mon Oct 14, 2019 10:12 pm

Here is the conversion from keV to J:
E = (140.11*10^3 eV)*(1.6022*10^-19 J/eV) = 2.2513*10^-14 J

Victor James 4I
Posts: 50
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:20 am

Re: Unit keV

Postby Victor James 4I » Thu Oct 17, 2019 6:30 pm

Does the eV unit relate to the work function (can someone also identify what the work function is)?

Nicholas_Gladkov_2J
Posts: 125
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Unit keV

Postby Nicholas_Gladkov_2J » Fri Oct 18, 2019 12:12 am

Michael Du 3J wrote:What does the unit keV stand for? Saw this unit on problem B5, did Professor Lavelle ever introduce this in the lectures?


KeV stands of Kilo electronvolt.
To convert you just need to know:
1) 1 kilo- is equal to 1000 base units (in this case eV).
2) 1eV is equal to 1.60218x10^-19 joules

I don't remember that they had an example in the textbook's section or displayed the conversion of these units, so I was confused as well.


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