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Frequencies

Posted: Sat Oct 19, 2019 3:15 pm
by Isabel Day 1D
Some module and homework questions ask which region of the electromagnetic spectrum certain wavelengths or frequencies correspond too. Are we supposed to memorize the frequencies or wavelengths of each type of light?

Re: Frequencies

Posted: Sat Oct 19, 2019 3:25 pm
by Doris Cho 1D
we'll probably have to know the more used ones like from microwaves to x-rays...

Re: Frequencies

Posted: Sat Oct 19, 2019 3:31 pm
by Kurtis Liang 3I
It also might help to memorize the visible light spectrum, as they might ask about what color a certain wavelength of light is.

Re: Frequencies

Posted: Sat Oct 19, 2019 10:15 pm
by Ruby Tang 2J
You should definitely memorize that UV is from 10-400 nm and that visible is from 400-700 nm in case you get a question about the Lyman or Balmer series, respectively.

Re: Frequencies

Posted: Sun Oct 20, 2019 2:37 am
by Lauren Bui 1E
I think it would be helpful to know the order from shortest wavelength to longest wavelength (gamma, x-ray, UV, visible, infared, radio).
This is what I was told in one of the workshops at least :)

Re: Frequencies

Posted: Sun Oct 20, 2019 10:40 am
by Kendra Barreras 3E
I think it would definitely be helpful to know the difference and in which categories the Lyman and Balmer series fall on. Also, there is a homework question that asks to order wavelengths in order of energy (or might be length), in any case maybe know the general order.

Re: Frequencies

Posted: Sun Oct 20, 2019 2:29 pm
by PGao_1B
In general, no memorization is required to solve a problem - everything you need will be given on the formula sheet. However, in this case, knowing the region of the frequency / wavelength of the electromagnetic spectrum will certainly be beneficial for you, both in terms of your chemistry knowledge and in terms of exams / tests.

Re: Frequencies

Posted: Sun Oct 20, 2019 3:03 pm
by AronCainBayot2K
It would be beneficial if you at least had a general understanding of the electromagnetic spectrum, particular visible light (400-700 nm). There was a question on the textbook, (1A5) I believe where it asks to put some of the radiation in the order of increasing energy, so that may be something to note.