Lyman vs. Balmer Series

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Nane Onanyan 1G
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Lyman vs. Balmer Series

Postby Nane Onanyan 1G » Fri Oct 23, 2020 1:24 pm

How can we tell if a problem requires using the Lyman or Balmer series (for example if we have to know the ground state) based on wavelength?

Kyle Walsh 2J
Posts: 75
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Re: Lyman vs. Balmer Series

Postby Kyle Walsh 2J » Fri Oct 23, 2020 1:30 pm

Hi! The Lyman and Balmer series just have different wavelength ranges associated with them, and unfortunately I think that's something we just have to memorize. I believe Lyman is 94-122 nm while Balmer is 410-656 nm. You could also figure out what series it is if a type of light is given, as Lyman is in the UV range while Balmer is in the visible spectrum. Hope this helps!

Rose_Malki_3G
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Re: Lyman vs. Balmer Series

Postby Rose_Malki_3G » Fri Oct 23, 2020 2:02 pm

If light is in the visible region (Balmer series), then the transition involves the n = 2 stage. Where as all traditions involving n =1 are with the ultra violet region (Lyman series)

ALee_1J
Posts: 110
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:32 pm

Re: Lyman vs. Balmer Series

Postby ALee_1J » Fri Oct 23, 2020 2:19 pm

Also, adding on to the previous replies... you may want to be careful of problems that say stuff like "blue light" or "red line" etc. bc that in itself is information. I skipped over it bc I had thought it was nonessential info, but that's telling you what type of series it is. Bc the Balmer series emits visible light, blue light or red light is considered to be part of the Balmer Series and therefore the wavelength will be from 400 to 700 nm.

Alen Huang 2G
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Re: Lyman vs. Balmer Series

Postby Alen Huang 2G » Fri Oct 23, 2020 2:24 pm

Lyman series involves electrons jumping down to the first energy level and this is usually UV light while Balmer series involves electrons jumping down to the second energy level and this is usually light in the visible region.

Chris_Butler_1A
Posts: 56
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Re: Lyman vs. Balmer Series

Postby Chris_Butler_1A » Fri Oct 23, 2020 4:57 pm

Kyle Walsh 1K wrote:Hi! The Lyman and Balmer series just have different wavelength ranges associated with them, and unfortunately I think that's something we just have to memorize. I believe Lyman is 94-122 nm while Balmer is 410-656 nm. You could also figure out what series it is if a type of light is given, as Lyman is in the UV range while Balmer is in the visible spectrum. Hope this helps!

I imagine this may be a simple question but do these values apply specifically to Hydrogen or will these nm ranges apply to all atoms we would potentially test? For example, would these values stay the same if we tested an atom of Oxygen? Appreciate the help!


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