Isoelectronic

Science questions not covered in Chem 14A and 14B. Try to limit questions to chemistry (inorganic chemistry, physical chemistry, organic chemistry, biophysical chemistry, biochemistry, materials science, environmental chemistry).

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Arkinrao3A
Posts: 11
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:58 pm

Isoelectronic

Postby Arkinrao3A » Sat Oct 22, 2016 2:13 pm

How do I determine which elements are isoelectronic with another given element? How do I compare isoelectronic qualities between elements?

Diana_Anum1G
Posts: 30
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:59 pm

Re: Isoelectronic

Postby Diana_Anum1G » Sat Oct 22, 2016 2:44 pm

I believe isoelectronic means having the same number of electrons or the same electronic structure. So for example K+ would be isoelectronic with Argon.

Franklin Kong 3D
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Joined: Fri Jul 22, 2016 3:00 am
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Re: Isoelectronic

Postby Franklin Kong 3D » Mon Oct 24, 2016 3:00 pm

Isoelectronic atoms are those that have the same # of electrons. Thus, no two different elements in non-cation, non-anion form can be isoelectronic. However, atoms of two different elements can be isoelectronic if one of the atoms is a cation or an anion. For example, K has one more atom than Neon. If one electron is taken away from K, making it a cation (K1+) then the K cation and Neon will have the same # of electrons and be isoelectronic. Therefore, to determine whether two atoms are isoelectronic, first determine how many electrons each element originally has on the periodic table, then if the element is a cation, subtract the charge of the atom from the element's original # of electrons. If the element is an anion, add the charge of the atom to the element's original # of electrons. Finally, compare the two final # of electrons for each element. If they are equal, then the two atoms are isoelectronic.

Luke_Lucido_3B
Posts: 15
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:58 pm

Re: Isoelectronic

Postby Luke_Lucido_3B » Mon Oct 24, 2016 6:41 pm

so isoelectric the same number of total electrons correct? not just valence

Diana_Anum1G
Posts: 30
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:59 pm

Re: Isoelectronic

Postby Diana_Anum1G » Tue Oct 25, 2016 12:15 am

Yes total


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