Classical vs Quantum

Science questions not covered in Chem 14A and 14B. Try to limit questions to chemistry (inorganic chemistry, physical chemistry, organic chemistry, biophysical chemistry, biochemistry, materials science, environmental chemistry).

Moderators: Chem_Mod, Chem_Admin

Jason_Glass_2L
Posts: 95
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:43 pm

Classical vs Quantum

Postby Jason_Glass_2L » Mon Oct 12, 2020 2:10 pm

Quick question, classical mechanics pertains to things you would learn in physics while quantum pertains more to chemistry right? I know there is a strong overlap between both chemistry and physics so it won't be definitive, but is this generally true?

Tikva Cohen 1K
Posts: 104
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:39 pm
Been upvoted: 1 time

Re: Classical vs Quantum

Postby Tikva Cohen 1K » Mon Oct 12, 2020 3:03 pm

I believe the main difference is that classical mechanics describes larger items or objects we can physically see and hold why quantum pertains to microscopic objects where our eyes can't actually see them. So if that's the case then you're most likely right because chemistry usually deals with microscopic objects and physics is macroscopic.

Emily Ding 1J
Posts: 103
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:36 pm
Been upvoted: 3 times

Re: Classical vs Quantum

Postby Emily Ding 1J » Mon Oct 12, 2020 3:17 pm

Another important difference is that classical mechanics usually deals with continuous functions and equations whereas most variables are quantized and discrete in quantum mechanics.

sophie esherick 3H
Posts: 119
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:35 pm
Been upvoted: 6 times

Re: Classical vs Quantum

Postby sophie esherick 3H » Mon Oct 12, 2020 3:21 pm

Classical mechanics was what you use for larger objects and it was used in physics before the theory of relativity and quantum mechanics, so it describes many aspects of nature at a macroscopic scale. Quantum mechanics describe things at subatomic scale or microscopic scale. You usually use quantum in chemistry just because we work with objects that are at subatomic scale with things such as electrons, protons and neutrons versus everyday objects like cars. Physics normally deals with things on macroscopic scales. Also, quantum mechanics are used over classical mechanics in chemistry since values for energy, momentum, angular momentum are restricted to discrete values (quantized values).

Samuel Flores 1E
Posts: 95
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:51 pm

Re: Classical vs Quantum

Postby Samuel Flores 1E » Mon Oct 12, 2020 3:26 pm

I agree with the responses above. When chemistry is dealing with subjects on the atomic scale, often we would be dealing with quantum mechanics. This is because we are looking at discrete units that cannot be broken down further. As quantum mechanics is often dealing with subjects on a microscopic scale, the atomic scale is often thought of in terms of QM.

Hope this helps!

Kimiya Aframian IB
Posts: 126
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:34 pm

Re: Classical vs Quantum

Postby Kimiya Aframian IB » Mon Oct 12, 2020 4:07 pm

Jason_Glass_3H wrote:Quick question, classical mechanics pertains to things you would learn in physics while quantum pertains more to chemistry right? I know there is a strong overlap between both chemistry and physics so it won't be definitive, but is this generally true?

Hi! I think the difference is that classical is the more general understanding and bigger picture while quantum is a more refined and zoomed in understanding of a model. So for in the example from lecture on 10/12/20, he said pouring water with the classical version would be continuous, but if we look on a closer level we see that the individual water molecules are being transferred. Hope this helps!

Kimiya Aframian IB
Posts: 126
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:34 pm

Re: Classical vs Quantum

Postby Kimiya Aframian IB » Mon Oct 12, 2020 4:07 pm

Jason_Glass_3H wrote:Quick question, classical mechanics pertains to things you would learn in physics while quantum pertains more to chemistry right? I know there is a strong overlap between both chemistry and physics so it won't be definitive, but is this generally true?

Hi! I think the difference is that classical is the more general understanding and bigger picture while quantum is a more refined and zoomed in understanding of a model. So for in the example from lecture on 10/12/20, he said pouring water with the classical version would be continuous, but if we look on a closer level we see that the individual water molecules are being transferred. Hope this helps!


Return to “General Science Questions”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest