Can we use formula E=mv^2 to calculate the total energy?


Moderators: Chem_Mod, Chem_Admin

Yizhou Liu 3L
Posts: 19
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:07 am

Can we use formula E=mv^2 to calculate the total energy?

Postby Yizhou Liu 3L » Thu Oct 19, 2017 12:30 pm

We know that E=pv and p=mv, which means total energy should equal to mv^2. In the photoelectric experiment, we also know that E=work function+(mv^2)/2. However, work function doesn't equal to (mv^2/2), which means this equation is wrong. Does anyone know where I get wrong? Thank you.

Curtis Tam 1J
Posts: 105
Joined: Thu Jul 13, 2017 3:00 am

Re: Can we use formula E=mv^2 to calculate the total energy?

Postby Curtis Tam 1J » Thu Oct 19, 2017 1:14 pm

I think it could be used but if the "velocity" of the work function is not given (I haven't seen a problem that gives velocity as part of a work function) then maybe it's not valid. I also know that photons have no rest mass so I don't know what you would put for "m".

Kevin Liu 3G
Posts: 28
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:07 am

Re: Can we use formula E=mv^2 to calculate the total energy?

Postby Kevin Liu 3G » Thu Oct 19, 2017 2:24 pm

I don't think that E and Ek are the same values so you can't exactly make the two equal. Ek is 1/2mv^2 whereas E is the energy needed to eject an electron. Also, for the questions relating Ek = E - work function most of the time Ek is 0 because the velocity is 0 meaning that the energy needed to eject an electron = work function.


Return to “DeBroglie Equation”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest