Midterm Question: wavelike properties


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torialmquist1F
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Joined: Sat Jul 22, 2017 3:00 am

Midterm Question: wavelike properties

Postby torialmquist1F » Sun Nov 19, 2017 5:49 pm

What does it mean to have measurable wavelike properties?

904940852
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Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:07 am

Re: Midterm Question: wavelike properties

Postby 904940852 » Sun Nov 19, 2017 6:27 pm

That the wavelength is able to be measured in an experiment. Large objects do not have measurable wavelike properties

Jonathan Tangonan 1E
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Joined: Sat Jul 22, 2017 3:01 am

Re: Midterm Question: wavelike properties

Postby Jonathan Tangonan 1E » Sun Nov 19, 2017 7:16 pm

I believe at one point in Dr. Lavelle's lectures he said that anything smaller than 10^-15m would be out of the range of an object being measurable.

Yadira Flores 1G
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Joined: Wed Nov 15, 2017 3:01 am

Re: Midterm Question: wavelike properties

Postby Yadira Flores 1G » Sun Apr 15, 2018 2:19 pm

I think it's meaning that in order to have 'measurable wavelike properties' it has to be within the range of the electromagnetic spectrum.

Komal Prakash 1H
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Re: Midterm Question: wavelike properties

Postby Komal Prakash 1H » Wed Apr 18, 2018 9:19 pm

In lecture today, Dr. Lavelle shared that in order for something to have measurable wavelike properties, it must have a wavelength bigger than 10^(-18)m. Thus, as described in class, a car would not have measurable wavelike properties as, in the example, its wavelength = 1.64x10^(-38)m. However, an electron does have wavelike properties (as shown in class, the electron had wavelength of 1.4x10^(-10)m, which is detectable in a lab.

Yeo Bin Yook 1K
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Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:05 am

Re: Midterm Question: wavelike properties

Postby Yeo Bin Yook 1K » Wed Apr 18, 2018 9:27 pm

Simply put, you can use the De Brolie equation (h/mass*velocity) to find out if the wavelength has measurable properties.
If the wavelength is less than 10^-18m it is not detectable/measurable because it is so small. And like everyone mentioned before, the examples he gave in class are helpful in understanding the concept.
If p is small and divides Planck's constant, the wavelength as a result should usually be relatively be large enough to be detectable.

Angelica Garcia 1-H
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Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:02 am

Re: Midterm Question: wavelike properties

Postby Angelica Garcia 1-H » Wed Apr 18, 2018 10:28 pm

Thanks thats really clarifying


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