DeBroglie wavelike properties question


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Diego Gonzalez 3F
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:26 am

DeBroglie wavelike properties question

Postby Diego Gonzalez 3F » Fri Oct 19, 2018 8:23 pm

So, according to the DeBroglie Equation, whether something has wavelike properties or not is dependent on how small it's wavelength is, correct?
What is the threshold number of wavelength that separates those with wavelike properties to those without?

Joon Chang 2F
Posts: 59
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:25 am

Re: DeBroglie wavelike properties question

Postby Joon Chang 2F » Fri Oct 19, 2018 8:55 pm

According to the lecture, all moving particles with momentum have wavelike properties, but the wavelike properties are only noticed for objects with small mass and high velocity. Professor Lavelle also stated a baseball has wavelike properties but the wavelength is so small it is smaller than what is able to be detected. I am not sure if there is a certain threshold wavelength that separates those with wavelike properties to those without, but as long as the wavelength is reasonable in terms of atoms and electrons, it would be considered to have wavelike characteristics.

Raymond Ko 1H
Posts: 29
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:19 am

Re: DeBroglie wavelike properties question

Postby Raymond Ko 1H » Fri Oct 19, 2018 9:48 pm

The previous answer is completely correct. I just wanted to add that there was a sort of threshold, or limit, to the wavelengths that detectors can actually measure in real life, which I think was around 10^-10 m.

Quinn_Simpson_3D
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:26 am

Re: DeBroglie wavelike properties question

Postby Quinn_Simpson_3D » Sun Oct 21, 2018 1:03 pm

All objects give off wavelength particles, as De Broglie's equation can apply to any object with momentum, or mass and velocity. However, some objects are way too big to give off noticeable wavelike properties, as the wavelengths are often extremely small. Professor Lavelle stated that the "threshold" that we see objects is around 10^-13 meters, but wavelengths such as 10^10 m are much more observable.

Jonathan Pai 2I
Posts: 121
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:27 am

Re: DeBroglie wavelike properties question

Postby Jonathan Pai 2I » Sun Oct 21, 2018 3:03 pm

A homework de Broglie question gave us the velocity and asked to find wavelength. When I first tried it, I tried finding KE but it did not work out. Then I used de Broglie which was much easier, but my question is is that when we are given a velocity, how can we decipher if it is KE question of de Broglie question?


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