Concept of a wave


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Timmy Nguyen Dis 1I
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Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:17 am

Concept of a wave

Postby Timmy Nguyen Dis 1I » Sat Oct 12, 2019 7:44 pm

Ok so I kinda get that if the wavelength of an gathered from the DeBroglie's equation can be measurable, that means that the object has wavelike properties. However, I'm still having trouble figuring out exactly what that means. Can someone help me?

Ariana Iranmahboub1G
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Joined: Fri Aug 09, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Concept of a wave

Postby Ariana Iranmahboub1G » Sat Oct 12, 2019 7:59 pm

All matters have wavelike properties. However, the de Broglie wavelength is only detectable for matters of very little mass. Wavelike properties means that the matter/particle can behave as a wave. And according to the de Broglie equation, the wavelength of the wave is inversely proportional to its mass and velocity.

Emil Velasco 1H
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Joined: Wed Nov 21, 2018 12:19 am

Re: Concept of a wave

Postby Emil Velasco 1H » Sat Oct 12, 2019 8:56 pm

Also I believe wavelike properties are only demonstrated by objects that are extremely small.

While light does exhibit wavelike properties, the equation cannot be applied towards it.

Timmy Nguyen Dis 1I
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Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Concept of a wave

Postby Timmy Nguyen Dis 1I » Sat Oct 12, 2019 11:44 pm

Emil Velasco 3I wrote:Also I believe wavelike properties are only demonstrated by objects that are extremely small.

While light does exhibit wavelike properties, the equation cannot be applied towards it.


So... does this mean objects with wavelike properties move in a wave? or what? That's the part I'm having trouble with understanding.

Eesha Sohail 1D
Posts: 100
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Concept of a wave

Postby Eesha Sohail 1D » Sun Oct 13, 2019 3:52 am

Timmy Nguyen Dis 3F wrote:
Emil Velasco 3I wrote:Also I believe wavelike properties are only demonstrated by objects that are extremely small.

While light does exhibit wavelike properties, the equation cannot be applied towards it.


So... does this mean objects with wavelike properties move in a wave? or what? That's the part I'm having trouble with understanding.


I had the same question as you and ended up having to research extensively to figure it out. Still, if I have something wrong or incomplete feel free to add corrections! According to the Heisenberg indeterminacy principle, we cannot know both the velocity and position of a particle at one time. So instead, we work with probability distributions - where the thing is most likely to be. It is helpful to think of electrons as circular standing waves, as shown in this article:
https://www.khanacademy.org/science/phy ... f-the-atom

The value of the wave function at a given point helps give the probability of finding an electron within a particular volume of space.

Again, if anyone else has a clearer explanation I would very much appreciate it. All the same, I hope this helps!

Timmy Nguyen Dis 1I
Posts: 107
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Concept of a wave

Postby Timmy Nguyen Dis 1I » Sun Oct 13, 2019 9:05 pm

Eesha Sohail 1J wrote:
Timmy Nguyen Dis 3F wrote:
Emil Velasco 3I wrote:Also I believe wavelike properties are only demonstrated by objects that are extremely small.

While light does exhibit wavelike properties, the equation cannot be applied towards it.


So... does this mean objects with wavelike properties move in a wave? or what? That's the part I'm having trouble with understanding.


I had the same question as you and ended up having to research extensively to figure it out. Still, if I have something wrong or incomplete feel free to add corrections! According to the Heisenberg indeterminacy principle, we cannot know both the velocity and position of a particle at one time. So instead, we work with probability distributions - where the thing is most likely to be. It is helpful to think of electrons as circular standing waves, as shown in this article:
https://www.khanacademy.org/science/phy ... f-the-atom

The value of the wave function at a given point helps give the probability of finding an electron within a particular volume of space.

Again, if anyone else has a clearer explanation I would very much appreciate it. All the same, I hope this helps!



Ok I think that helps clear it up a bit. Thanks!

Trent Yamamoto 2J
Posts: 111
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:18 am

Re: Concept of a wave

Postby Trent Yamamoto 2J » Sun Oct 13, 2019 9:14 pm

DeBroglie is used when detecting extremely small masses (unlike the car example in lecture).

Lauren Sanchez 3D
Posts: 52
Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Concept of a wave

Postby Lauren Sanchez 3D » Sun Oct 13, 2019 10:13 pm

So, if a particle has wavelike properties, then the particle itself is somewhat moving in a wave pattern?


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