the m in the de broglie equation


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Angeline 3E
Posts: 50
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:20 am

the m in the de broglie equation

Postby Angeline 3E » Thu Oct 17, 2019 7:46 pm

so when we use the de broglie equation is m always the mass of an atom??

Shimei_2F
Posts: 100
Joined: Fri Aug 09, 2019 12:17 am

Re: the m in the de broglie equation

Postby Shimei_2F » Thu Oct 17, 2019 7:50 pm

yes, m is the mass of the particle.

Megan Jung 3A
Posts: 50
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:17 am

Re: the m in the de broglie equation

Postby Megan Jung 3A » Thu Oct 17, 2019 7:53 pm

m refers to the mass of the object you are calculating. In some problems, the mass is not always an atom; it could be a baseball or car. However those values usually give wavelengths that are undetectable. m can also refer to the mass of an electron or neutron.

Andrew Liang 1I
Posts: 105
Joined: Fri Aug 30, 2019 12:18 am

Re: the m in the de broglie equation

Postby Andrew Liang 1I » Thu Oct 17, 2019 8:39 pm

The "m" in De Broglie's equation refers to the mass of the object with momentum, P, and has wavelike properties with wavelength. However if the mass is large then the object most likely does not have detectable wave-light property and acts more like a particle.

Shrayes Raman
Posts: 129
Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:15 am

Re: the m in the de broglie equation

Postby Shrayes Raman » Fri Oct 18, 2019 12:08 am

Not always atom. Whatever the object or particle is in the context of the problem.

Matt F
Posts: 100
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:17 am

Re: the m in the de broglie equation

Postby Matt F » Fri Oct 18, 2019 10:20 am

m could represent the mass of an object, like a baseball or car as others mentioned, or a particle such as a proton, neutron, or electron. The only thing it can't represent is a photon since photons have no mass. If the problem involves a photon/light, use c=wavelength*frequency.


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