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When to use DeBrogile's Equation

Posted: Sun Oct 20, 2019 6:26 pm
by Shanzey
How do we know when to use DeBrogile's equation? Do we only use it for electrons, since they have a mass, while photons do not?

Re: When to use DeBrogile's Equation

Posted: Sun Oct 20, 2019 6:37 pm
by Haley Pham 4I
DeBroglie's Equation is used for things or particles that have mass and that behave like a wave.

Re: When to use DeBrogile's Equation

Posted: Sun Oct 20, 2019 7:00 pm
by Osvaldo SanchezF -1H
For DeBrogile's and other like equations, you have to read the question and what it ask for, and sometimes you might have to combine two equations to get the desired value that you look for. But for DeBrogile's equation you use it for anything that has mass and behaves like a wave.

Re: When to use DeBrogile's Equation

Posted: Sun Oct 20, 2019 7:04 pm
by DTingey_1C
The equation is only practically used for objects that have an observable wavelength. Since objects like cars have a velocity and mass, and therefore momentum, they have a wavelength when plugged into the equation. But, since the mass of the car is too great, the momentum is too high and the wavelength is not observable. The wavelength needs to be within the angstrom (1x10^-10m) range to be observable from what Lavelle said.

Re: When to use DeBrogile's Equation

Posted: Sun Oct 20, 2019 7:05 pm
by DTingey_1C
Also protons do have a mass, so they could be theoretically applied to the equation.