Wave Length Properties


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Jaclyn Dang 3B
Posts: 67
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:02 pm

Wave Length Properties

Postby Jaclyn Dang 3B » Mon Oct 19, 2020 8:27 pm

How do we know if something has measurable wavelength properties? How do we know if we can detect it or not?

Sami Siddiqui 1J
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Re: Wave Length Properties

Postby Sami Siddiqui 1J » Mon Oct 19, 2020 8:29 pm

Usually, we can tell if a wavelength is detectable if the actual number you came up with is smaller than the size of an atomic bond, which is basically in picometers. If you start going smaller than that, we really get into some gray area in that regard. As a rule of thumb, if you're working with macroscopic objects like cars or baseballs, their wavelengths will be undetectable.

JaesalSoma1E
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Re: Wave Length Properties

Postby JaesalSoma1E » Mon Oct 19, 2020 8:31 pm

If you are using the De Broglie Wave equation to determine if something has wavelike properties, the cutoff for the wavelength is around 10^-15 m. Anything smaller than that won't have wavelike properties.

Jaclyn Dang 3B
Posts: 67
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:02 pm

Re: Wave Length Properties

Postby Jaclyn Dang 3B » Mon Oct 19, 2020 11:58 pm

Thank you for the responses! I was reading ahead and had this question and didn't realize that the professor answered in lecture already!


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