Avogadro's Number


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905409193
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Avogadro's Number

Postby 905409193 » Sun Nov 01, 2020 5:57 pm

One of the Sampling Q's explained that we needed to use Avogadro's number but I'm not too familiar with it. What is it and when should we use it?

Lillian Ma 1I
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Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby Lillian Ma 1I » Sun Nov 01, 2020 5:59 pm

Avogadro's number is 6.02 x 10^23 mol^-1, and it's used to describe an amount of something like molecules, atoms, or formula units.

Mahika More 1H
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Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby Mahika More 1H » Sun Nov 01, 2020 6:01 pm

It is used to describe the number of molecules or atoms per mole. If you have some amount of moles you can use Avogadro's number to convert.

jasmineculilap_3F
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Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby jasmineculilap_3F » Sun Nov 01, 2020 6:05 pm

Avogadro's number means that 1 mole (mol) is equal to 6.0221 * 10^23 particles. Particles can refer to molecules/atoms/formula units. You usually use it when you need to convert moles to atoms/molecules. For example, the mass on the periodic table is molar mass so you would divide by avogadro's number to get the mass of a single atom.

Grace_Remphrey_2J
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Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby Grace_Remphrey_2J » Sun Nov 01, 2020 6:10 pm

Hello! The answers above are super helpful, but I'm definitely a visual learner so I found a youtube video that explains super clearly! Hope this helps.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M5q_YMN4CtY

Edwin Liang 1I
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Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby Edwin Liang 1I » Sun Nov 01, 2020 7:37 pm

Avogadro's number is 6.02214 * 10^23 units. These units tell us the amount of "stuff" in a mole. For example, there are 6.02214 * 10^23 atoms of Nitrogen in a Mole of Nitrogen.

905409193
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Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby 905409193 » Sun Nov 01, 2020 8:05 pm

Sweet! Thank you!!!

Mina Tadros 3L
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Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby Mina Tadros 3L » Sun Nov 01, 2020 8:08 pm

Avogadro's number is 6.022 x 10^23, and you would use it when looking for formula units, atoms, photons, and any particle (just not moles or grams).

Diana Aguilar 3H
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Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby Diana Aguilar 3H » Sun Nov 01, 2020 8:14 pm

Avogadro's number is 6.022*10^23 and it is used to describe the amount of something there is in a mole.

Kiana Javier 3G
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Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby Kiana Javier 3G » Sun Nov 01, 2020 9:03 pm

On top of what everyone else has said, it was helpful for me to remember to use Avogadro's number when converting kJmol^-1 to J. Your last step in this conversion would be to divide by Avogadro's number to cancel the mol^-1 out and have your answer in just J. This came up for me when solving the Audio-Visual Modules, and I couldn't seem to get the answer right because I was forgetting this last step. Hope this helps!

Ethan Goode 2H
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Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby Ethan Goode 2H » Sun Nov 01, 2020 9:08 pm

Avogadro's number basically is just a way of converting something from moles to particles or vice versa. It relates the number of moles to number of atoms or particles.

Katie Nye 2F
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Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby Katie Nye 2F » Sun Nov 01, 2020 9:08 pm

Avogadro's number is 6.02 x 10^23. It identifies how many particles are in a mole and is often used in unit conversions between moles and particles.

jessicaosuna_1F
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Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby jessicaosuna_1F » Sun Nov 01, 2020 9:09 pm

Hi! I use it whenever I need to add mol-1 to the ratio for the answer or when I need to cancel out mol to get my units to match.

Sreeram Kurada 3H
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Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby Sreeram Kurada 3H » Sun Nov 01, 2020 9:11 pm

Basically use Avogadro's number whenever you are trying to convert to moles or from moles into individual particles of the substance.

Aliya Roserie 3I
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Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby Aliya Roserie 3I » Sun Nov 01, 2020 9:11 pm

We can use Avogadro's number in order to convert to a unit of necessity such as molecules, atoms, etc.

Joshua Swift
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Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby Joshua Swift » Sun Nov 01, 2020 9:45 pm

You want to use Avogadro's number hen you are given moles but the question asks for an answer in terms of one atom, molecule, formula unit, etc.

Talia Dini - 3I
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Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby Talia Dini - 3I » Sun Nov 01, 2020 10:37 pm

Hi! Avogadro's number is 6.02x10^23 mol^-1. This number is usually used to describe the number of atoms or formula units.

Yolanda_Xing_3A
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Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby Yolanda_Xing_3A » Sun Nov 01, 2020 11:06 pm

Avogadro's number is 6.02x10^23. It is the conversation number between mol and number of particles. 6.02x10^23 Particles equals one mol.

Hasan Mirza 3F
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Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby Hasan Mirza 3F » Sun Nov 01, 2020 11:16 pm

Avogadro's' number is the constant number of any type of particle in a mole. For example, when you are given the molar mass of Hydrogen, that is the weight of 6.022x10^23 hydrogen atoms.

David Jen 1J
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Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby David Jen 1J » Sun Nov 01, 2020 11:22 pm

Avogadro's number represents the number of atoms in one mole. Thus, we should use it whenever a question asks for something regarding atoms.

Samudrala_Vaishnavi 3A
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Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby Samudrala_Vaishnavi 3A » Mon Dec 07, 2020 7:59 am

Avogadro's number is approximated by 6.022*10^23 and it basically represents the number of atoms in a mole of any element which is different from the individual atomic mass. You can multiply the moles of something by Avogadro's number to get the atom amount of it. You can divide by Avogadro's number to get the mole value of something in atoms, photons, or formula units.

CesarLec1
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Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby CesarLec1 » Tue Dec 08, 2020 9:56 pm

It tells us the number of photons, electrons, molecules, atoms, etc. Anything really small and it gives it to us per mol and it is 6.022x10^23. We use it when it asks how many photos per mole or how much mass a specific molecule has.


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