Minimum Indeterminacy  [ENDORSED]


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Jasleen Kaur 1J
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Minimum Indeterminacy

Postby Jasleen Kaur 1J » Tue Oct 11, 2016 9:43 pm

Your bowling ball of mass 4.02kg rolls down a lane with a speed of 2.35+/- 0.1 m.s^-1. What is the minimum indeterminacy of its position? Can you blame the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle when your ball misses the pins?

I had trouble solving this?

Lyndon_Bui_3J
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Joined: Sat Jul 09, 2016 3:00 am

Re: Minimum Indeterminacy  [ENDORSED]

Postby Lyndon_Bui_3J » Tue Oct 11, 2016 11:24 pm

So you want to use the equation ΔpΔx=h/4pi. The equation is normally with a greater than or equal to sign, but since it says minimum, just use equal sign. The minimum indeterminacy of position is Δx, so you just solve for Δx using plancks constant (h) and plugging in the rest. Δp=mΔv, because momentum (p) is defined as m (mass) times v (velocity). Mass is given, so you just have to figure out what the indeterminacy of velocity (Δv) is. hint: use the margin of error given. Hope that helps!

Jenny_Thompson_3I
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Re: Minimum Indeterminacy

Postby Jenny_Thompson_3I » Wed Oct 12, 2016 1:53 pm

Another note to this when you are imputing the velocity into the equation you need to multiply it by 2 due to the fact that there is a +/- sign in front of it. This will account for both the positive and negative uncertainty of the velocity.

Jazmin Martin 1D
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Joined: Fri Dec 04, 2015 3:00 am

Re: Minimum Indeterminacy

Postby Jazmin Martin 1D » Thu Oct 13, 2016 6:23 pm

But we multiply the 2 to 2.35+/-0.1 m/s or just multiply 2 to 0.1m/s. I'm still a little confused on that part.

Cuz like how Is that done on a step by step mathematical basis.

Thank you,
Jazmin

Jimmy Zhou 3D
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Re: Minimum Indeterminacy

Postby Jimmy Zhou 3D » Sun Oct 16, 2016 5:16 pm

In regards to why it's multiplied by 2. +-0.1 is only one arm of the indeterminancy factor. delta V refers to the both arms or sides of the indeterminancy so we must use 0.2 instead of 0.1 as velocity can either be =0.1 or -0.1.

Drake_Everlove_1K
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Re: Minimum Indeterminacy

Postby Drake_Everlove_1K » Sun Oct 30, 2016 8:29 pm

Jimmy Zhou 1D wrote:In regards to why it's multiplied by 2. +-0.1 is only one arm of the indeterminancy factor. delta V refers to the both arms or sides of the indeterminancy so we must use 0.2 instead of 0.1 as velocity can either be =0.1 or -0.1.


So do you mean that any value in the delta V must be multiplied by 2, always? What if the indeterminancy is something like +0.3 to -0.2, would that number then be 0.5 delta V?

Joseph Nguyen 3L
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Joined: Fri Jul 22, 2016 3:00 am

Re: Minimum Indeterminacy

Postby Joseph Nguyen 3L » Mon Oct 31, 2016 11:49 am

So do you mean that any value in the delta V must be multiplied by 2, always? What if the indeterminancy is something like +0.3 to -0.2, would that number then be 0.5 delta V?


No, he does not mean that. V itself is velocity. delta V is UNCERTAINTY in velocity. For this problem, the uncertainty is + or - .1, for which the total uncertainty is the range of how far away in values the velocity can be, which is .1 * 2 = .2. If the uncertainty was from .3 to -.2, then the range would be .5, and therefore delta V would be 0.5. That just means that in a the lowest velocity possible and the highest velocity possible (or the uncertainty) can be .5 m/s apart.


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