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Equation

Posted: Thu Oct 18, 2018 6:08 pm
by Kimberly 1H
What is the significance of h/4 in Heisenberg's uncertainty equation?

Re: Equation

Posted: Thu Oct 18, 2018 8:31 pm
by Chem_Mod
With this value, you can determine the uncertainties in momentum or distance of a particle via the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle. The main thing to take away is that the uncertainties are inversely proportional (ex. the more certain we know momentum's value, the less certain we know distance's value, and vice versa).

Re: Equation

Posted: Fri Oct 19, 2018 8:57 pm
by Karina Jiayu Xu 4E
Is there a reason why they use pie?

Re: Equation

Posted: Sun Oct 21, 2018 2:26 pm
by 005199302
I read that it was derived by integrating wave functions over the bell curve.

Re: Equation

Posted: Sun Oct 21, 2018 2:32 pm
by Chem_Mod
What the inequality says is that the absolute best you can do when determining both momentum and position at the same time is h/4π. This means that the uncertainty can be equal to h/4π or more, never less.

Re: Equation

Posted: Sun Oct 21, 2018 7:22 pm
by Layla Manoochehri
im confused, is it h/4π or is it h(bar)/2? or are they the same thing?

Re: Equation

Posted: Sun Oct 21, 2018 7:33 pm
by Jennifer Guzman 4C
Layla Manoochehri wrote:im confused, is it h/4π or is it h(bar)/2? or are they the same thing?

From my understanding, They are the same thing but most physic majors tend to use h(bar)/2