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h with a line through it?

Posted: Sun Oct 21, 2018 7:55 pm
by marcus lin 1E
So Dr. Lavelle was talking about how h/4pi is the same as h with that line through it/2pi, can someone explain the difference?

Re: h with a line through it?

Posted: Sun Oct 21, 2018 7:56 pm
by Yiting_Gong_4L
H-bar is equal to h/2pi.

Re: h with a line through it?

Posted: Sun Oct 21, 2018 8:01 pm
by Aili Ye 4L
As the person stated above, h-bar is the same thing as h/2, there is no difference.

Re: h with a line through it?

Posted: Sun Oct 21, 2018 9:08 pm
by ryanhon2H
h bar is h/2π. The difference is in the Heisenberg equation where it could be (Δp x Δx) = h/4π or (Δp x Δx) = 1/2(h bar). 1/2(h bar) simplifies to h/4π

Re: h with a line through it?

Posted: Sun Oct 21, 2018 10:29 pm
by Luc Lorain 1L
It just represents another one of those symbols that physicists created to make their lives easier while writing calculations. Its a similar concept to the Hamiltonian, which represents a long expression related to wave-particle duality with the letter H.

Re: h with a line through it?

Posted: Sun Oct 21, 2018 11:44 pm
by ran2000
h bar is h/2pi

Re: h with a line through it?

Posted: Sun Oct 21, 2018 11:49 pm
by Sheridan Slaterbeck 1J
H bar is just a short hand notation, that is used just to simplify what is written. ( Hbar= h/2 pi) (H bar/2 = h/4 pi)

Re: h with a line through it?

Posted: Sun Oct 21, 2018 11:53 pm
by Jackie Ngo 1C
h bar is essentially another way to say h/2pi. it can also be called Planck's constant, in case you didn't already know (I just discovered this in my discussion section)

Re: h with a line through it?

Posted: Mon Oct 22, 2018 11:41 pm
by Jake Gordon 1A
h bar is equivalent to h/2pi so...hbar/2 is equivalent to h over 4pi which is what the right side of the Heisenberg equation requires.