Calculating Velocity


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Sydni Stewart
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:29 am
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Calculating Velocity

Postby Sydni Stewart » Sat Oct 27, 2018 5:08 pm

Is there any type of indicator that you may have not converted right or messed up somewhere in the equation when calculating velocity? For example should you ever get like 3.4 x 10 ^ -12 m/s as your velocity? Is it possible to be that small?

WilliamNguyen_4L
Posts: 65
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:28 am

Re: Calculating Velocity

Postby WilliamNguyen_4L » Sat Oct 27, 2018 5:13 pm

When you calculate for velocity using the Heisenberg Indeterminancy Equation, you are solving for the uncertainty in velocity not the velocity itself. Therefore the values can be very large or very small. The value you get just indicates how large the margin of error is for the actual velocity. If you get a very small uncertainty in velocity for your answer it just means that the range in which the actual velocity should be in is very small.

Sapna Ramappa 1J
Posts: 63
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:24 am

Re: Calculating Velocity

Postby Sapna Ramappa 1J » Sat Oct 27, 2018 6:12 pm

Sydni Stewart wrote:Is there any type of indicator that you may have not converted right or messed up somewhere in the equation when calculating velocity? For example should you ever get like 3.4 x 10 ^ -12 m/s as your velocity? Is it possible to be that small?


Yes, it is possible for the number to be that small, because the Heisenberg formula calculates the margin of uncertainty/change in velocity and thus, delta-V can be of any value. If the number was very small (3.4 x 10^-12 m/s, for example), this means that the margin of uncertainty is quite small.

Matthew Choi 2H
Posts: 59
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:18 am

Re: Calculating Velocity

Postby Matthew Choi 2H » Sun Oct 28, 2018 11:25 pm

Don't worry if you get a super small or large value for your delta v or delta x. As long as you plugged in the correct numbers then you should get the correct value in the end. The size of the value only determines how big the range of uncertainty is. So, if you end up getting a super small value for delta v, it only means the range of uncertainty for the velocity of the particle is extremely small. If you're predicting the range of uncertainty for an electron, for example, the small delta v will usually mean there is a large delta x.

Akhil Paladugu 3G
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:26 am

Re: Calculating Velocity

Postby Akhil Paladugu 3G » Mon Oct 29, 2018 11:32 pm

It is important to not have present values on what you think the answer in velocity is. Yes that answer may seem super small, but if you followed the process of the question carefully there is a chance that you end up with that answer. You should judge it based on the rest of the given data, that is a better gage than just generalizing for a range of values for velocity.


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