Minimum uncertainty?


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MKearney_4G
Posts: 50
Joined: Fri Aug 30, 2019 12:18 am

Minimum uncertainty?

Postby MKearney_4G » Mon Oct 21, 2019 12:57 am

If the HBI Equation gives us the minimum uncertainty, what does this mean in context? Does this imply that the object could actually have a greater uncertainty in its position/momentum?

Ariel Davydov 1C
Posts: 110
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:16 am
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Re: Minimum uncertainty?

Postby Ariel Davydov 1C » Mon Oct 21, 2019 12:24 pm

Because this equation provides us with the minimum uncertainty in position/momentum, this means that the actual uncertainty in position/momentum is equal to or greater than the value given or calculated, which means that, yes, the uncertainty can be greater than the value obtained. Hope this helps!

Brian_Ho_2B
Posts: 221
Joined: Fri Aug 09, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Minimum uncertainty?

Postby Brian_Ho_2B » Mon Oct 21, 2019 12:25 pm

MKearney_4G wrote:If the HBI Equation gives us the minimum uncertainty, what does this mean in context? Does this imply that the object could actually have a greater uncertainty in its position/momentum?

The equation is saying that there is a limit to how much we can know about position and momentum simulataneously. That is why the minimum product of both uncertainties is h/4(pi). The more we know about position, the less likely we will know a lot about momentum and vice versa. To answer your second question, an object (or electron) can have a greater uncertainty in position or momentum. It just has to follow the rule that delta(momentum) times delta(position) is greater than or equal to h/4(pi) and it has to follow the rule that the uncertainty in momentum (and thus uncertainty in velocity) is a reasonable range that doesn't go beyond the speed of light, if you can recall that example from lecture.


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