Max Vs. Min Uncertainty


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Tikva Cohen 2I
Posts: 44
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:39 pm

Max Vs. Min Uncertainty

Postby Tikva Cohen 2I » Tue Oct 27, 2020 9:24 am

I’m not sure if we ever learned or if there is a difference between the minimum and maximum uncertainty in Heisenberg’s equation. Is there a difference, and if so is there something different you do to find them using the equation?

Quinton Sprague 2D
Posts: 42
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:35 pm

Re: Max Vs. Min Uncertainty

Postby Quinton Sprague 2D » Tue Oct 27, 2020 10:49 am

The uncertainty equation is given as P(change)*X(change) is greater than or equal to h/4pi. Due to the greater than or equal to, any value for position(x), momentum(p), velocity(v), or mass(m) that satifies the equation given the other variables, will already be the minimum possible value for that variable. When we are solving it we pretend the greater than or equal to is simply a = therefore the values we find are automatically the lowest they may be.

As for a maximum, I believe it may be any variable values that satify the greater than aspect. So it seems that would make maximums practically limitless as to the uncertainty of an equation, as long as your values for x,p,v, or m make sense in context. Someone correct my notion on the maximum if not true.

Hope this helps.

Tikva Cohen 2I
Posts: 44
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:39 pm

Re: Max Vs. Min Uncertainty

Postby Tikva Cohen 2I » Tue Oct 27, 2020 1:12 pm

Quinton Sprague 2D wrote:The uncertainty equation is given as P(change)*X(change) is greater than or equal to h/4pi. Due to the greater than or equal to, any value for position(x), momentum(p), velocity(v), or mass(m) that satifies the equation given the other variables, will already be the minimum possible value for that variable. When we are solving it we pretend the greater than or equal to is simply a = therefore the values we find are automatically the lowest they may be.

As for a maximum, I believe it may be any variable values that satify the greater than aspect. So it seems that would make maximums practically limitless as to the uncertainty of an equation, as long as your values for x,p,v, or m make sense in context. Someone correct my notion on the maximum if not true.

Hope this helps.



Okay, thank you! But when we’re so living problems and it asks for either maximum or minimum, we don’t change anything about the way we plug into equations and solve, right?

aashmi_agrawal_3j
Posts: 49
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:39 pm

Re: Max Vs. Min Uncertainty

Postby aashmi_agrawal_3j » Wed Oct 28, 2020 5:26 pm

I don't think you change anything when plugging numbers into problems for maximum and minimum uncertainty. The solution to these problems is always >= when plugging numbers into the equation so if it asks for the minimum, you simply put in the answer you get when you solve the equation.

kateraelDis2F
Posts: 48
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:54 pm

Re: Max Vs. Min Uncertainty

Postby kateraelDis2F » Wed Oct 28, 2020 5:32 pm

oooh I get in now thanks!

Mirren Solomon Discussion 2G
Posts: 41
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:39 pm

Re: Max Vs. Min Uncertainty

Postby Mirren Solomon Discussion 2G » Thu Oct 29, 2020 6:52 pm

I also have a question about this kind of question.
Does it matter what the original values given to us are? I mean as far as the original numbers states in the problem impacting whether we are solving for the minimum or maximum wavelength.


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