Boundary Surface of Orbitals  [ENDORSED]

Moderators: Chem_Mod, Chem_Admin

JennaMinami1I
Posts: 18
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:56 pm

Boundary Surface of Orbitals

Postby JennaMinami1I » Thu Oct 06, 2016 5:28 pm

I noticed in the course reader that it stated we should know the boundary surface of orbitals. Is that the shape of the region in which electrons can be found (for example: the s orbital is a ping pong ball shape in which there is a high probability of finding electrons inside of it, the p orbital has a sort of dumb-bell shape, etc)?

Any help would be much appreciated!

JennaMinami1I
Posts: 18
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:56 pm

Re: Boundary Surface of Orbitals  [ENDORSED]

Postby JennaMinami1I » Thu Oct 06, 2016 7:17 pm

Well... this is awkward because I'm answering my own question.
But just in case anybody clicked on this because they were also confused, I found the answer to my question in the textbook!

Boundary Surfaces: Shapes of atomic orbitals
s-orbital: Spherical
p-orbital: Dumbbell or peanut
d-orbital: Four leaf clover or dumbbell with equatorial torus (aka doughnut shape)

Also from textbook: Visualize AO as a surface (boundary surface) within which there is a given probability of finding the electron. For example, the 95% boundary surface, within which the probability of finding an electron is 95%

Justin Folk 3I
Posts: 43
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:56 pm

Re: Boundary Surface of Orbitals

Postby Justin Folk 3I » Thu Oct 06, 2016 8:32 pm

Those shapes are right, but important to note that it's not the "boundary," but rather the probability region-- where an electron is most likely to be-- if I understand correctly!


Return to “Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest