2.19

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princessturner1G
Posts: 31
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:05 am

2.19

Postby princessturner1G » Wed May 02, 2018 10:44 pm

How do we know how many subshells there are when we are given an n value?

For example, "How many subshells are there in the shell with n=4?"

Jocelyn Fermin1J
Posts: 49
Joined: Tue Nov 14, 2017 3:01 am

Re: 2.19

Postby Jocelyn Fermin1J » Wed May 02, 2018 11:30 pm

princessturner1G wrote:How do we know how many subshells there are when we are given an n value?

For example, "How many subshells are there in the shell with n=4?"

Hi, I use this method:
subshells are the L (orbital angular momentum), to figure out the L: look at them as levels. Start at 0 and continue writing down the subshells until you have reached the desired "n" number for instance,
n=1, (subshells)L=0
n=2, (subshells)L=0,1
n=3, (subshells)L=0,1,2
n=4,(subshells) L=0,1,2,3
>side note: 0="s" 1="p" 2="d" 3="f"
n=1-4 these levels are the only ones that chemist use, but you can go higher up in levels for instance,
n=7, L=0,1,2,3,4,5,6

Previously mentioned, there is a really good picture about identifying shell, subshells, and orbitals; That is helpful too!
Best of Luck hoped this was clear!

Yeo Bin Yook 1K
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:05 am

Re: 2.19

Postby Yeo Bin Yook 1K » Thu May 03, 2018 6:03 pm

Given the n value, you can know how many subshells there are by looking at the l value.
simply put [l=0,...n-1]
To answer your question:
EX) How many subshells are there in the shell with n=4?
if n=5 then l=0,1,2,3,4 which would equal to 5 subshells

FizaBaloch1J
Posts: 41
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:01 am

Re: 2.19

Postby FizaBaloch1J » Sat May 05, 2018 4:45 pm

Jocelyn Fermin1J wrote:
princessturner1G wrote:How do we know how many subshells there are when we are given an n value?

For example, "How many subshells are there in the shell with n=4?"

Hi, I use this method:
subshells are the L (orbital angular momentum), to figure out the L: look at them as levels. Start at 0 and continue writing down the subshells until you have reached the desired "n" number for instance,
n=1, (subshells)L=0
n=2, (subshells)L=0,1
n=3, (subshells)L=0,1,2
n=4,(subshells) L=0,1,2,3
>side note: 0="s" 1="p" 2="d" 3="f"
n=1-4 these levels are the only ones that chemist use, but you can go higher up in levels for instance,
n=7, L=0,1,2,3,4,5,6

Previously mentioned, there is a really good picture about identifying shell, subshells, and orbitals; That is helpful too!
Best of Luck hoped this was clear!


Wow, thank you so much! That really helped!!


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