Page 1 of 1

Shielding

Posted: Fri Oct 19, 2018 10:19 pm
by Michael Nirula
Because the 2S and 2P orbitals both have the quantum # n=2, I thought that these orbitals were the same distance from the nucleus, but I believe Prof. Lavelle mentioned today that the 2P orbital experiences shielding from the 2S orbital. Is this true/does the 2P orbital experience shielding from the 2S orbital?

Re: Shielding

Posted: Fri Oct 19, 2018 10:36 pm
by Swetha Ampabathina1I
Yes the 2p orbital does experience shielding from the 2s orbital since the 2s orbital is closer to the nucleus and can block out the charge from the electrons from the 2p orbital since they are farther away

Re: Shielding

Posted: Sat Oct 20, 2018 1:32 pm
by Hannah Yates 1K
Technically the 2s and 2p are the same orbital, but they have different suborbital. S is the closest suborbital to the nucleus, then P, then D, and so on.

Re: Shielding

Posted: Sat Oct 20, 2018 2:37 pm
by Madeline Motamedi 4I
So, from what I'm understanding from this, the sub orbitals within one n are different distances from the nucleus. Am I correct?

Re: Shielding

Posted: Sat Oct 20, 2018 2:39 pm
by Andrew Lam 3B
The p-orbital experiences less pull from the nucleus because some of the repulsion from s-orbital electrons are also affecting it. Thus, we need something called effective nuclear charge to describe the binding strength of electrons. They are the same energy level (in the case of 2s and 2p) but are varying distances from the nucleus.

Re: Shielding  [ENDORSED]

Posted: Sat Oct 20, 2018 5:33 pm
by Jonathan Pai 2I
The terms are subshell and orbital, not suborbital. shell(n)>>subshell(l)>>>orbital(ml)

Yes you are correct. The n value, for example 2 in 2s and 2p, provides a small "range" of energy levels. In that range of n=2, s orbital is closer than p orbital, so the p orbital does experience less attraction b/c the s orbital is closer. So even though they are at the same energy level of n=2, the s is closer within that energy level(range).

Re: Shielding

Posted: Sat Oct 20, 2018 7:28 pm
by Margaret Akey
So the orbitals closer to the nucleus are always the ones that shield the further away electrons?

Re: Shielding

Posted: Sat Oct 20, 2018 9:56 pm
by Josceline 3J
Hello everyone, I'm struggling a bit with this concept. In the hw, it told us to find the ground state of elements (ex: Bi which has 83 electrons) and then the answer was [Xe]4f^(14)5d^(10)6s^(2)6p^(3). When it comes to elements with a high number of electrons is there another way to go about this other than having to do the (s,p,d,f) level one by one to come to the answer. It can be a lot of work when dealing with big numbers.

Re: Shielding

Posted: Sun Oct 21, 2018 4:43 pm
by danicatran4
What are the consequences of shielding? I understand it means the electrons far away from the nucleus are less electronegative, but why does it matter?

Re: Shielding

Posted: Sun Oct 21, 2018 4:50 pm
by Venya Vaddi 1L
Because of shielding, the outer electrons feel reduced electrostatic attraction, resulting in an effective nuclear charge. Shielding explains why it is easier (in other words, requires less energy) to remove the outer electrons because the outer electrons have less of an electrostatic attraction from the nucleus. Shielding is also an argument used to explain other periodic trends.

Re: Shielding

Posted: Sun Oct 21, 2018 7:12 pm
by Michael Nirula
Ok great think I've got it thanks guys

Re: Shielding

Posted: Mon Oct 22, 2018 11:14 am
by Brian Chang 2H
The 2s orbital shields the 2p orbitals from the electronegative attraction of the nucleus.

Re: Shielding

Posted: Mon Oct 22, 2018 12:36 pm
by Mayaal_Khan_4H
Josceline 3J wrote:Hello everyone, I'm struggling a bit with this concept. In the hw, it told us to find the ground state of elements (ex: Bi which has 83 electrons) and then the answer was [Xe]4f^(14)5d^(10)6s^(2)6p^(3). When it comes to elements with a high number of electrons is there another way to go about this other than having to do the (s,p,d,f) level one by one to come to the answer. It can be a lot of work when dealing with big numbers.


Starting with the Nobel gas to make your answer shorter is the only way, I think.

Re: Shielding

Posted: Mon Nov 05, 2018 1:56 pm
by Brian Chang 2H
Josceline 3J wrote:Hello everyone, I'm struggling a bit with this concept. In the hw, it told us to find the ground state of elements (ex: Bi which has 83 electrons) and then the answer was [Xe]4f^(14)5d^(10)6s^(2)6p^(3). When it comes to elements with a high number of electrons is there another way to go about this other than having to do the (s,p,d,f) level one by one to come to the answer. It can be a lot of work when dealing with big numbers.


Start from the closest Noble gas (lower in electron number, not higher. lol.) and work upwards. There is no short notation for this.

Re: Shielding

Posted: Sat Nov 10, 2018 6:36 pm
by Shibhon_Shepard
WHAT DOES THIS EVEN MEAN????? I don't even remember this being talked about.

Re: Shielding

Posted: Sun Oct 13, 2019 7:54 pm
by Tahlia Mullins
Since the 2s orbital is closest to the nucleus, the 2p orbital experiences shielding from the nucleus, increasing the diameter of the atom.