Page 1 of 1

nodal/radial planes

Posted: Fri Oct 26, 2018 11:46 am
by Bruce Chen 2H
Is there a formula we can use to calculate the number of nodal/radial planes?

Re: nodal/radial planes

Posted: Fri Oct 26, 2018 1:36 pm
by Andre_Galenchik_2L
For nodal planes I am pretty sure p has 1, and then as you go up each subshell it increases by 2. So d has 3 nodal planes and f has 5 and so on. Is there a difference between nodal and radial planes?

Re: nodal/radial planes

Posted: Fri Oct 26, 2018 9:02 pm
by Chase Yonamine 1J
To determine the number of nodal planes, we simply must know that in the s orbital there is 0 nodal planes, in the p orbital there is 1 nodal plane, and in the d orbital there are 2 nodal planes. In other words, the number of nodal planes is equal to the value of the angular momentum quantum number, l.

Re: nodal/radial planes

Posted: Fri Oct 26, 2018 11:59 pm
by Anmol_cheema_2F
The number of nodal/radial planes is equal to the value of l. Therefore, s has 0, p has 1, and d has 2.

Re: nodal/radial planes

Posted: Sun Oct 28, 2018 9:24 pm
by Brice McKeown 3D
Hi, wanted to ask if the wave function equaling zero is basically another way of saying no electrons will be found at that location?

Re: nodal/radial planes

Posted: Sun Oct 28, 2018 9:56 pm
by Louise Zhuang
Yes, when the wave function passes zero, its probability density(which is its derivative) is also zero, thus making it a nodal plane.