1D.25

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Chris Tai 1B
Posts: 102
Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:16 am

1D.25

Postby Chris Tai 1B » Wed Oct 16, 2019 4:11 pm

Which of the following subshells CANNOT exist in an atom:
(a) 2d
(b) 4d
(c) 4g
(d) 6f
Why is 6f able to exist in an atom? I'm a bit confused since the f-block of the periodic table ends at 4f and 5f

Benjamin Feng 1B
Posts: 102
Joined: Sat Sep 07, 2019 12:19 am

Re: 1D.25

Postby Benjamin Feng 1B » Wed Oct 16, 2019 4:34 pm

Even though the periodic table ends at 4f and 5f, theoretically there could exist an atom if it had more mass that would have a 6f orbital. This element is either undiscovered yet or highly unstable or both.

What the question is asking is more theoretical, and looking for what subshells l can exist given a principle quantum number n. You know that the range of l is between 0 and n-1 and between the 4 options, one of them doesn't follow that rule.

EvanWang
Posts: 101
Joined: Sat Sep 07, 2019 12:16 am

Re: 1D.25

Postby EvanWang » Wed Oct 16, 2019 5:26 pm

When a question asks whether a certain orbital can exist, it is asking if the quantum numbers are possible. If we look at 6f as an example,
Because: n=6
The possible values of l are: l=(0 to n-1) or 0,1,2,3,4,5
We know that the f subshell occurs when l=3. Since 3 is listed in the possible values of l, we know that 6f can exist.

Angela Patel 2J
Posts: 110
Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:17 am

Re: 1D.25

Postby Angela Patel 2J » Wed Oct 16, 2019 5:42 pm

Yes, you can look at the quantum numbers in order to identify whether or not a certain orbital can exist. We know that 2d cannot exist because the angular momentum quantum number can never equal 2 when n =2 (It must be 0 or 1, which correspond to the s or p orbitals). On the other hand, 6f can exist because the angular momentum quantum number can equal 3 when n=6.


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