What does the "x" indicate in (i.e.) the 2px state?  [ENDORSED]

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EmilyJoo_1G
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Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:16 am

What does the "x" indicate in (i.e.) the 2px state?

Postby EmilyJoo_1G » Wed Oct 16, 2019 8:56 pm

Today, Prof went over an example where an atom with the quantum numbers n=2, l=2, and ml= -1 would be in the 2px state. What does the "x" mean and how did he arrive at 2px using the quantum numbers?

Gerald Bernal1I
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Re: What does the "x" indicate in (i.e.) the 2px state?  [ENDORSED]

Postby Gerald Bernal1I » Wed Oct 16, 2019 9:02 pm

The x indicates which plane the 2p orbital is in. The two orbitals can lie on the x, y, or z plane. https://qph.fs.quoracdn.net/main-qimg-5 ... 63712171dd

Michelle Chan 1J
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Re: What does the "x" indicate in (i.e.) the 2px state?

Postby Michelle Chan 1J » Wed Oct 16, 2019 9:03 pm

I think x,y, and z correlate to the planes. He derived x by looking at the table from the slides.

EvaLi_3J
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Re: What does the "x" indicate in (i.e.) the 2px state?

Postby EvaLi_3J » Wed Oct 16, 2019 9:27 pm

I believe that x just means the x plane. Because the orbitals are 3D models, so we have x, y, and z planes. There could be multiple p orbitals in one atom, and they are normally arranged in different directions. To distinguish them, we use x to indicate the one that goes along the direction of the x-xis.

Hope that helps, and correct me if I'm wrong!

Trent Yamamoto 2J
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Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:18 am

Re: What does the "x" indicate in (i.e.) the 2px state?

Postby Trent Yamamoto 2J » Wed Oct 16, 2019 10:58 pm

The x is in reference to the plane, among the x, y, and z planes

Patricia Chan 1C
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Re: What does the "x" indicate in (i.e.) the 2px state?

Postby Patricia Chan 1C » Wed Oct 16, 2019 11:04 pm

I believe the x is representative for the plane. There are three planes, x, y, and z. Hope that helps.


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