oribital numbers

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lasarro
Posts: 55
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:15 am

oribital numbers

Postby lasarro » Sat Oct 26, 2019 9:30 am

How do I know how many oribitals there are in s,p,d,f?

Kyla Grunden 1L
Posts: 46
Joined: Sat Sep 07, 2019 12:16 am

Re: oribital numbers

Postby Kyla Grunden 1L » Sat Oct 26, 2019 11:40 am

Unfortunately, this is just memorization! s has 1 orbital, p has 3, d has 5, and f has 7.

Hope this helps!

Chloe Alviz 1E
Posts: 102
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:17 am

Re: oribital numbers

Postby Chloe Alviz 1E » Sat Oct 26, 2019 11:45 am

You can generally memorize the number of orbitals, but if you want to be technical...

You can figure out the number of orbitals per sub shell through the quantum numbers!

The subshells are depicted by l = 0,1,2,3 (which is s,p,d, and f, respectively). The magnetic quantum number m represents the individual orbitals within each subshell, where m = l, 1 - 1, ..., -l.

For l = 0 (the s-subshell), the only orbital you can have is 0. Therefore, there is only 1 orbital in that subshell.
For l = 1 (the p-subshell) , the individual orbitals you could have are 1, 0, -1 - which 3 orbitals in total.
For l = 2 (the d-subshell), the individual orbitals you could have are 2, 1, 0, -1, -2 - which are 5 orbitals in total.
For l = 3 (the f-subshell), the individual orbitals you could have are 3, 2,1,0,-1,-2 ,-3 - which are 7 orbitals in total.

Anne Tsai 1F
Posts: 50
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:15 am

Re: oribital numbers

Postby Anne Tsai 1F » Sat Oct 26, 2019 1:52 pm

If you want to see the number of orbitals per subshell visually, you can count the number of elements in one row of a block on the periodic table, then divide that number by 2 because each orbital holds a maximum of 2 electrons.

PGao_1B
Posts: 50
Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:15 am

Re: oribital numbers

Postby PGao_1B » Sat Oct 26, 2019 10:08 pm

The s subshell has 1 orbital that can hold up to 2 electrons, the p subshell has 3 orbitals that can hold up to 6 electrons, the d subshell has 5 orbitals that hold up to 10 electrons, and the f subshell has 7 orbitals with 14 electrons.

kendal mccarthy
Posts: 109
Joined: Wed Nov 14, 2018 12:22 am

Re: oribital numbers

Postby kendal mccarthy » Sun Oct 27, 2019 2:00 pm

What helps me is looking at the periodic table and counting how many atoms are in each subshell and pretending they are electrons, for example: for s subshells there are 2 atoms on the periodic table (2 electrons), in the p subshells there are 6 atoms on the periodic table (6 electrons), in the d subshells there are 10 atoms on the periodic table (10 electrons), and in the f subshells there are 14 atoms on the periodic table (14 electrons). Then I just divide by 2 because each orbital can hold up to 2 electrons.

britthanul234
Posts: 51
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:21 am

Re: oribital numbers

Postby britthanul234 » Sun Oct 27, 2019 8:59 pm

You basically count the number of elements in one row of the period table, then divide that by 2 electrons in order because one orbital can only hold a maximum of 2 electrons.

Juana Abana 1G
Posts: 100
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:15 am

Re: oribital numbers

Postby Juana Abana 1G » Mon Oct 28, 2019 9:05 am

Chloe Alviz 3F wrote:You can generally memorize the number of orbitals, but if you want to be technical...

You can figure out the number of orbitals per sub shell through the quantum numbers!

The subshells are depicted by l = 0,1,2,3 (which is s,p,d, and f, respectively). The magnetic quantum number m represents the individual orbitals within each subshell, where m = l, 1 - 1, ..., -l.

For l = 0 (the s-subshell), the only orbital you can have is 0. Therefore, there is only 1 orbital in that subshell.
For l = 1 (the p-subshell) , the individual orbitals you could have are 1, 0, -1 - which 3 orbitals in total.
For l = 2 (the d-subshell), the individual orbitals you could have are 2, 1, 0, -1, -2 - which are 5 orbitals in total.
For l = 3 (the f-subshell), the individual orbitals you could have are 3, 2,1,0,-1,-2 ,-3 - which are 7 orbitals in total.



Thank you so much this is really helpful.


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