Orbitals

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Lily Mohtashami
Posts: 146
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:34 pm

Orbitals

Postby Lily Mohtashami » Sat Oct 24, 2020 7:44 pm

How come in lecture Dr. Lavelle says when n is 2, l can be 0,1, or 2. I thought l had to be n-1 so shouldn't l only be 1 if n is 2?

Sophia Spungin 2E
Posts: 95
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:41 pm

Re: Orbitals

Postby Sophia Spungin 2E » Sat Oct 24, 2020 8:04 pm

I believe that he was demonstrating that the upper bound of l is n-1. It can take on any possible values from 0 to n-1, with n-1 being the upper bound value. I don't think that if n=2 l could equal 1, but it could equal 0 or 1.

This is a chart that I used to better understand it. When n=3, l can have any value up to n-1.

Image

Alan Huang 1E
Posts: 77
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:37 pm

Re: Orbitals

Postby Alan Huang 1E » Sun Oct 25, 2020 1:02 am

Hm, I'm not sure that's correct? Maybe Dr. Lavelle misspoke but when n = 2, l should be only equal to 0 or 1 since l's upper bound is l = n-1. However, I may be incorrect.

LeanneBagood_2F
Posts: 91
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:32 pm

Re: Orbitals

Postby LeanneBagood_2F » Sun Oct 25, 2020 2:23 pm

Sophia Spungin wrote:I believe that he was demonstrating that the upper bound of l is n-1. It can take on any possible values from 0 to n-1, with n-1 being the upper bound value. I don't think that if n=2 l could equal 1, but it could equal 0 or 1.

This is a chart that I used to better understand it. When n=3, l can have any value up to n-1.

Image


Thank you so much for providing this chart! I saw it in the lecture but was unsure how to find it on my own.

I notice that on the side they provide images of the shapes (?) of the orbitals? Do they correspond to the n-values they are next to? If so, do the n-values sort of determine the dimension (ie 2-Dimensional, 3-Dimensional) of the orbitals?

Sofia Lombardo 2C
Posts: 90
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:31 pm

Re: Orbitals

Postby Sofia Lombardo 2C » Sun Oct 25, 2020 3:08 pm

LeanneBagood_2E wrote:
Sophia Spungin wrote:I believe that he was demonstrating that the upper bound of l is n-1. It can take on any possible values from 0 to n-1, with n-1 being the upper bound value. I don't think that if n=2 l could equal 1, but it could equal 0 or 1.

This is a chart that I used to better understand it. When n=3, l can have any value up to n-1.

Image


Thank you so much for providing this chart! I saw it in the lecture but was unsure how to find it on my own.

I notice that on the side they provide images of the shapes (?) of the orbitals? Do they correspond to the n-values they are next to? If so, do the n-values sort of determine the dimension (ie 2-Dimensional, 3-Dimensional) of the orbitals?



The n-values correspond to the energy level. The l-values (angular momentum) describes the shape of an orbital. For example, if n = 3 then l can be 0 (s), 1 (p), 2 (d), all of which have different shapes. So the shape of the orbital depends on the angular momentum.

Hope this helps!

David Liu 1E
Posts: 90
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:07 pm

Re: Orbitals

Postby David Liu 1E » Sun Oct 25, 2020 7:32 pm

it's always n-1, and I'm sure where in lecture he stated that, but it should only be for the 0 and 1 orbitals, and not the second!

AHUNT_1A
Posts: 110
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:41 pm

Re: Orbitals

Postby AHUNT_1A » Sun Oct 25, 2020 8:01 pm

Sofia Lombardo 3F wrote:
LeanneBagood_2E wrote:
Sophia Spungin wrote:I believe that he was demonstrating that the upper bound of l is n-1. It can take on any possible values from 0 to n-1, with n-1 being the upper bound value. I don't think that if n=2 l could equal 1, but it could equal 0 or 1.

This is a chart that I used to better understand it. When n=3, l can have any value up to n-1.

Image


Thank you so much for providing this chart! I saw it in the lecture but was unsure how to find it on my own.

I notice that on the side they provide images of the shapes (?) of the orbitals? Do they correspond to the n-values they are next to? If so, do the n-values sort of determine the dimension (ie 2-Dimensional, 3-Dimensional) of the orbitals?



The n-values correspond to the energy level. The l-values (angular momentum) describes the shape of an orbital. For example, if n = 3 then l can be 0 (s), 1 (p), 2 (d), all of which have different shapes. So the shape of the orbital depends on the angular momentum.

Hope this helps!



Thank you so much. Extremely helpful


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