The orbitals

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jordanginyard_
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Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:43 pm

The orbitals

Postby jordanginyard_ » Sun Nov 01, 2020 2:11 pm

What do we need to know about the s-, p-, d-, f- orbitals and the importance. What do the 2s and 3s stand for?

Alan Huang 1E
Posts: 77
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:37 pm

Re: The orbitals

Postby Alan Huang 1E » Sun Nov 01, 2020 2:29 pm

For the s, p, d, and f orbitals, you should probably know number of orbitals. S has 1, p has 3, d has 5, f has 7.
You should probably also know number of electrons. S has 2, p has 6, d has 10, and f has 14.

2s is the 2nd shell, s orbital. 3s would be 3rd shell, s orbital.

Sreeram Kurada 3H
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Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:00 pm

Re: The orbitals

Postby Sreeram Kurada 3H » Sun Nov 01, 2020 2:32 pm

You have to know that they are different classification of atoms, meaning the electrons in these atoms are arranged in different ways giving them unique properties. The difference between the 3s and 2s orbital is that the 3s orbital has an extra shell of electrons.

Sunny Wu 3A
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Re: The orbitals

Postby Sunny Wu 3A » Sun Nov 01, 2020 2:33 pm

In regards to the second part of your question, the 2 and 3 stand for the energy level of the electron with that orbital (state), corresponding with the principal quantum number n. The s corresponds with the angular momentum quantum number l and s indicates that the orbital takes on a spherical shape.

abby hyman
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Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:16 am

Re: The orbitals

Postby abby hyman » Sun Nov 01, 2020 2:40 pm

I think there is a lot of information we will need to know requiring the orbitals. Mainly, it is important to be able to identify an atom from its ground-state electron configuration, (which is where the 2s and 3s come from). The periodic table is separated into blocks, corresponding to the type of subshell that is being filled. There are s,d,p, and f blocks. To get the ground-state electron configuration for an atom, you find its location on the periodic table and determine all of the subshells that must be filled to get to the correct configuration. For example, if you were trying to find the configuration for the element Oxygen, electrons must first fill the 1s^2 block, then the 2s^2 block, and the first 4 spots of the 2p^6 block so the final configuration would be 1s^2 2s^2 2p^4

Joanna Huang
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Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:40 pm

Re: The orbitals

Postby Joanna Huang » Sun Nov 01, 2020 9:59 pm

We definitely need to know the basic information, such as where the spdf blocks are located on the periodic table, and how many orbitals are in each. s has 1 orbital, p has 3, d has 5, and f has 7. Each orbital can contain up to 2 electrons. "2s" stands for the 2nd line of the periodic table, and the s orbital. "3s" stands for the 3rd line, and the s orbital.

Kendall_Dewey_2D
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Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:04 pm

Re: The orbitals

Postby Kendall_Dewey_2D » Sun Nov 08, 2020 11:56 am

This Socratic link gives a clear description of orbitals and what they represent: https://socratic.org/chemistry/the-elec ... -spd-and-f

It does a good job of breaking down the different s,p,d,f orbitals and explains the numbers as well!

Megan Lu 3D
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Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:49 pm

Re: The orbitals

Postby Megan Lu 3D » Sun Nov 08, 2020 7:10 pm

Hi! I believe that of all the information we are responsible for regarding orbitals, we especially need to be familiar with information like the number of orbitals in s/p/d/f, the location of the spdf blocks on the periodic table, etc.

As for 2s, the 2 refers to the 2nd energy level, and the s refers to the spherical shape of the orbital. Similarly, for 3s, the 3 refers to the 3rd energy level, and the s also refers to the spherical shape of the orbital.


Diana Aguilar 3H
Posts: 90
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:50 pm

Re: The orbitals

Postby Diana Aguilar 3H » Sun Nov 08, 2020 9:25 pm

Hi! I believe that we need to know the location of the s,p,d,and f blocks on the periodic table and how many orbitals are in each. "2s" is represented by the row of the periodic table where it is located so for this it would be the second row followed by the orbital it is in which is s and the same goes for "3s". "3s" is in the 3rd row of the periodic table followed by the orbital it is in which would be s.


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