HW question 2.17  [ENDORSED]

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Elias Ruben 1O
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Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:56 pm

HW question 2.17

Postby Elias Ruben 1O » Fri Oct 14, 2016 8:14 pm

What does the question mean when it asks how many orbitals are in subshells with an l-value. I know what n, l, and m_l mean, but the wording is confusing me. Could someone please break it down for me?

Janette 3B
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Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2016 3:00 am

Re: HW question 2.17  [ENDORSED]

Postby Janette 3B » Sat Oct 15, 2016 12:47 pm

The question states" How many orbitals are in sub-shells will l equal to a)0 b)2 c)1 d)3"

for a) you know that L=0 corresponds to a s-orbital and s orbitals have 1orbital therefore the answer is 1 orbital

b) l=2 corresponds to a d-orbital and d orbitals have 5 orbitals , therefore the answer is 5

c) l=1 corresponds to a p-orbital and p orbitals have 3 orbitals, therefore the answer is 3

d) l=3 corresponds to a f-oritbal and f orbital shave 7 orbitals, therefore the answer is 7

* as long as you remember that overtime l=0 , it will always pertain to an s -orbital,l=1 will always pertain to a p-orbital, l=2 will always pertain to a d-orbital, etc.*

Chem_Mod
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Re: HW question 2.17

Postby Chem_Mod » Sat Oct 15, 2016 12:57 pm

You can determine the number of orbitals that correspond to a certain angular momentum quantum number (l) by remembering that magnetic quantum number (ml) labels different orbitals in a subshell.

ml= -l, -l+1,...0,...l-1, l
The number of ml values you can assign to l is the number of orbitals that correspond to that specific l.

Leslie Almaraz 4G
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Re: HW question 2.17

Postby Leslie Almaraz 4G » Sat Oct 05, 2019 9:16 pm

The quantum number of l corresponds to the shape of the orbital. Quantum numbers specify specific spacial qualities of an orbital. l=0 corresponds to the s orbital. While l=1 corresponds to the p-orbital, l=2 corresponds to the d orbital and l=3 corresponds to the f-orbital.

ahuang
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Re: HW question 2.17

Postby ahuang » Sat Oct 05, 2019 10:36 pm

To find the number of orbitals in a subshell using l, there is a formula:
# orbitals = 2l + 1

Jamie Wang 3G
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Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:51 pm

Re: HW question 2.17

Postby Jamie Wang 3G » Wed Nov 11, 2020 4:49 am

Does just remembering the number of orbitals for s,p,d, and f always work for the number of orbitals, or should we always double-check with the ml -1,0,1 etc?

annabelchen1a
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Re: HW question 2.17

Postby annabelchen1a » Wed Nov 11, 2020 10:14 pm

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I'm pretty sure you can just remember the number of orbitals for each subshell (1 for s, 3 for p, 5 for d, and 7 for f). I guess if you don't remember the number of orbitals you could always figure it out by using quantum number ml and counting the number of possible values but it seems unnecessary.

haley f
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Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:49 pm

Re: HW question 2.17

Postby haley f » Sun Nov 15, 2020 4:08 pm

Janette 3B wrote:The question states" How many orbitals are in sub-shells will l equal to a)0 b)2 c)1 d)3"

for a) you know that L=0 corresponds to a s-orbital and s orbitals have 1orbital therefore the answer is 1 orbital

b) l=2 corresponds to a d-orbital and d orbitals have 5 orbitals , therefore the answer is 5

c) l=1 corresponds to a p-orbital and p orbitals have 3 orbitals, therefore the answer is 3

d) l=3 corresponds to a f-oritbal and f orbital shave 7 orbitals, therefore the answer is 7

* as long as you remember that overtime l=0 , it will always pertain to an s -orbital,l=1 will always pertain to a p-orbital, l=2 will always pertain to a d-orbital, etc.*


How do you know which values of l correspond to which orbitals, do you just have to memorize them?


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