HW question 2.17  [ENDORSED]

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Elias Ruben 1O
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Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:56 pm

HW question 2.17

Postby Elias Ruben 1O » Fri Oct 14, 2016 8:14 pm

What does the question mean when it asks how many orbitals are in subshells with an l-value. I know what n, l, and m_l mean, but the wording is confusing me. Could someone please break it down for me?

Janette 3B
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Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2016 3:00 am

Re: HW question 2.17  [ENDORSED]

Postby Janette 3B » Sat Oct 15, 2016 12:47 pm

The question states" How many orbitals are in sub-shells will l equal to a)0 b)2 c)1 d)3"

for a) you know that L=0 corresponds to a s-orbital and s orbitals have 1orbital therefore the answer is 1 orbital

b) l=2 corresponds to a d-orbital and d orbitals have 5 orbitals , therefore the answer is 5

c) l=1 corresponds to a p-orbital and p orbitals have 3 orbitals, therefore the answer is 3

d) l=3 corresponds to a f-oritbal and f orbital shave 7 orbitals, therefore the answer is 7

* as long as you remember that overtime l=0 , it will always pertain to an s -orbital,l=1 will always pertain to a p-orbital, l=2 will always pertain to a d-orbital, etc.*

Chem_Mod
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Re: HW question 2.17

Postby Chem_Mod » Sat Oct 15, 2016 12:57 pm

You can determine the number of orbitals that correspond to a certain angular momentum quantum number (l) by remembering that magnetic quantum number (ml) labels different orbitals in a subshell.

ml= -l, -l+1,...0,...l-1, l
The number of ml values you can assign to l is the number of orbitals that correspond to that specific l.

Leslie Almaraz 4G
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Joined: Fri Aug 02, 2019 12:16 am

Re: HW question 2.17

Postby Leslie Almaraz 4G » Sat Oct 05, 2019 9:16 pm

The quantum number of l corresponds to the shape of the orbital. Quantum numbers specify specific spacial qualities of an orbital. l=0 corresponds to the s orbital. While l=1 corresponds to the p-orbital, l=2 corresponds to the d orbital and l=3 corresponds to the f-orbital.

ahuang
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Re: HW question 2.17

Postby ahuang » Sat Oct 05, 2019 10:36 pm

To find the number of orbitals in a subshell using l, there is a formula:
# orbitals = 2l + 1


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