Question 2.19 b.

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allyz1F
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Question 2.19 b.

Postby allyz1F » Mon Oct 30, 2017 2:31 pm

I am still getting the hang of ml terms, but the question asks: "How many values of m(l) are allowed for an electron in a 3p-subshell?"
I thought that because ml= l, l-1, -l... the answer would be 3, 2, 1, 0, -1, -2, -3 for a total of seven values but the answer is 5 starting at 2 to -2. Why is this?

Chem_Mod
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Re: Question 2.19 b.

Postby Chem_Mod » Mon Oct 30, 2017 2:39 pm

In my textbook, 2.19b refers to 6d, not 3p. It is possible that your textbook edition does not match the textbook answers.

Kayla Ikemiya 1E
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Re: Question 2.19 b.

Postby Kayla Ikemiya 1E » Mon Oct 30, 2017 5:13 pm

For 3p, you know that n=3 and the fact that it's in the p-orbital indicates that l=1. Therefore, there are 3 values for ml. 1,0,-1.

Emily Glaser 1F
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Re: Question 2.19 b.

Postby Emily Glaser 1F » Tue Oct 31, 2017 12:31 am

m_l is in reference to the quantum number l, not the quantum number n, so with 3p, n=3 and l=1, since l is associated with the orbital subshells, not the energy levels (n). Therefore, m_l would be -1, 0, 1.

Yadira Flores 1G
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Re: Question 2.19 b.

Postby Yadira Flores 1G » Wed May 02, 2018 12:13 pm

I had a question about part a of this problem. The question states: "How many values of the quantum number l are possible when n=7? Since l=0,1,2,..n-l is my answer of seven correct? I'm just confused because I know l indicates the subshell and because we have not talked about those above l=3(f-orbital) I am unsure if that's correct.

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Re: Question 2.19 b.

Postby Chem_Mod » Wed May 02, 2018 12:27 pm

Yes, there are seven possibilities for l if n = 7, and they would be 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6. We have only learned the letters corresponding to the first 4 numbers (up to l = 3) but there are letters corresponding to the rest (there is such a thing as a 7g subshell, but we don't ever encounter this in the ground state configurations of elements currently discovered)


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