# of electrons for a given orbital (homework 2.25)

Moderators: Chem_Mod, Chem_Admin

victoriatanaka1C
Posts: 38
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:05 am

# of electrons for a given orbital (homework 2.25)

Postby victoriatanaka1C » Sun Apr 29, 2018 4:59 pm

I'm just looking for clarification - is the number of electrons that can occupy a given orbital equal to the number of possible values of m times 2?

Chiara Berruto 1K
Posts: 29
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:01 am

Re: # of electrons for a given orbital (homework 2.25)

Postby Chiara Berruto 1K » Sun Apr 29, 2018 5:34 pm

Only 2 electrons can occupy a single orbital, one electron will be spinning up while the other spins down.

Elizabeth Parker 1K
Posts: 33
Joined: Wed Nov 15, 2017 3:00 am

Re: # of electrons for a given orbital (homework 2.25)

Postby Elizabeth Parker 1K » Sun Apr 29, 2018 5:43 pm

Yeah it will never be more than two electrons in a single orbital, it will just start to fill another.

Chem_Mod
Posts: 17949
Joined: Thu Aug 04, 2011 1:53 pm
Has upvoted: 406 times

Re: # of electrons for a given orbital (homework 2.25)

Postby Chem_Mod » Sun Apr 29, 2018 5:47 pm

To find the total number of electrons in a subshell, l, you multiply the total number of mls by 2. If you need to find the total number of electrons in a shell, n, you can easily use the formula 2n2. And Chiara is correct that the total number of electrons in an orbital, ml, is always 2. Be careful of the terminology that questions use, because it will change your answer.


Return to “Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests