1E. 1

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JamieVu_2C
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Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:16 am

1E. 1

Postby JamieVu_2C » Sun Oct 20, 2019 7:39 pm

Which of the following increase when an electron in a lithium atom undergoes a transition from the 1s-orbital to a
2p-orbital?
(a) Energy of the electron.
(b) Value of n.
(c) Value of l.
(d) Radius of the atom.
Which answers would be different for a hydrogen atom and in what way would they be different?

I know that for a-d, each would increase. But I'm not sure which of them would change for a hydrogen atom, except I know that the energy of the electron in a hydrogen atom would remain the same. So, would the value of n and l or the atomic radius change for a hydrogen atom if its electron transitions from the 1s-orbital to a 2p-orbital?

Justin Vayakone 1C
Posts: 110
Joined: Sat Sep 07, 2019 12:19 am

Re: 1E. 1

Postby Justin Vayakone 1C » Sun Oct 20, 2019 8:00 pm

Actually, all four of the values would still increase if the electron was in a hydrogen atom. All of the reasoning for the Lithium electron is the same for a hydrogen atom. In both cases, the the electron moves from an s-orbital to a p-orbital, which means the energy and n value is increased. When n value increases, the l value increases as well. Then in regards to atomic radius, it increases because the electron is further out.

Jordan Ziegler 2J
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Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:15 am

Re: 1E. 1

Postby Jordan Ziegler 2J » Sun Oct 20, 2019 8:01 pm

All of these also increase for a hydrogen atom as well. I think the important part of the question is understanding why these increase in a hydrogen atom versus a lithium atom.

For a, b, and c, (all properties that apply to single-electron systems), the reason for the increase is the same between hydrogen and lithium.

For d (radius of the atom), it's important to note that if the transition had been from 1s to 2s, the radius would not increase because an electron was already in this orbital. Because the excited electron is moving to an empty orbital with less electron shielding, the radius increases.

Mariah
Posts: 104
Joined: Fri Aug 02, 2019 12:16 am

Re: 1E. 1

Postby Mariah » Tue Oct 22, 2019 12:39 pm

Jordan Ziegler 1J wrote:All of these also increase for a hydrogen atom as well. I think the important part of the question is understanding why these increase in a hydrogen atom versus a lithium atom.

For a, b, and c, (all properties that apply to single-electron systems), the reason for the increase is the same between hydrogen and lithium.

For d (radius of the atom), it's important to note that if the transition had been from 1s to 2s, the radius would not increase because an electron was already in this orbital. Because the excited electron is moving to an empty orbital with less electron shielding, the radius increases.


So the radius of the electron would only increase if it goes into a different orbital? Specifically, a bigger one?

905385366
Posts: 54
Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:16 am

Re: 1E. 1

Postby 905385366 » Tue Oct 22, 2019 8:21 pm

Mariah wrote:
Jordan Ziegler 1J wrote:All of these also increase for a hydrogen atom as well. I think the important part of the question is understanding why these increase in a hydrogen atom versus a lithium atom.

For a, b, and c, (all properties that apply to single-electron systems), the reason for the increase is the same between hydrogen and lithium.

For d (radius of the atom), it's important to note that if the transition had been from 1s to 2s, the radius would not increase because an electron was already in this orbital. Because the excited electron is moving to an empty orbital with less electron shielding, the radius increases.


So the radius of the electron would only increase if it goes into a different orbital? Specifically, a bigger one?


Yes the radius of the electron would increase if it goes into a different orbital that is a larger one by increasing the energy level (n value increase) but also if it jumps to another subshell (l value increases). For example, an atom with a 3p subshell would be slightly larger than an atom that only has a 3s subshell.


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