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Balmer and Lyman Series

Posted: Sun Oct 20, 2019 9:11 pm
by emaad_3H
Can someone explain what the Balmer and Lyman series are and what the significance of them is?

Re: Balmer and Lyman Series

Posted: Sun Oct 20, 2019 9:43 pm
by zachary_nhem_4I
The Lyman series involves an electron that jumps to or from the ground state (n=1), and the Balmer series involves an electron that jumps to or from the n=2 energy level. The Lyman series corresponds to ultraviolet rays while I believe the Balmer series corresponds to visible rays.

Re: Balmer and Lyman Series

Posted: Sun Oct 20, 2019 9:45 pm
by Christine Honda 2I
They both apply to the Hydrogen atom. Emission or absorption processes in hydrogen give rise to series, which are sequences of lines corresponding to atomic transitions, each ending or beginning with the same atomic state in hydrogen. For the Lyman series, which corresponds to UV light, the electrons come to rest at the energy level n=1. For the Balmer series, which corresponds to visible light, the electrons come to rest at the energy level n=2

Re: Balmer and Lyman Series

Posted: Mon Oct 21, 2019 12:50 pm
by Keerthana Sivathasan 2E
The Balmer and Lyman series relate to hydrogen. The emission spectrum of atomic hydrogen consists of particular wavelengths, which was discovered by Johann Jakob Balmer, a Swiss schoolteacher in 1853. He found that the visible wavelengths fit a mathematical formula. These wavelengths known as the Balmer series were later shown to be just one of several similar series of possible wavelengths that all had similar formulas. These can be expressed in one overall formula called the Rydberg formula. For the Lyman series of lines (in the ultraviolet range) n=1. For the Balmer series n=2. The other series are the Paschen(n=3), Brackett(n=4), and Pfund(n=5).

Re: Balmer and Lyman Series

Posted: Wed Oct 23, 2019 11:36 pm
by Camille 4I
For the ultraviolet region of atomic hydrogen, I know that n=1. Can I use the equation frequency = R(1/n1^2 - 1/n2^2) to solve these problems?

Re: Balmer and Lyman Series

Posted: Thu Oct 24, 2019 1:06 am
by Lindsey Chheng 1E
emaad_3H wrote:Can someone explain what the Balmer and Lyman series are and what the significance of them is?

Knowing the Balmer and Lyman series can help us identify whether or not the light is in the visible or UV region. Sometimes a problem will simply state that the light involved is in, say the UV region. You would have to know that this corresponds to the Lyman series, where the electrons end up in the n=1 shell, to do your calculations and solve the problem.

Re: Balmer and Lyman Series

Posted: Thu Oct 24, 2019 2:38 am
by Jasmine 2C
The Balmer Series and Lyman Series are basically the names for these sets of lines on the spectral emission gradient(?) that corresponds to specific amounts of wavelength needed to cause an electronic transition from one state to the next. So for the Balmer Series, all the lights have a wavelength that corresponds to visible light, and Lyman Series have wavelengths that correspond to ultraviolet light. Also, the Balmer Series always result in an electron transmission from some quantum number n to the principal quantum number 2, n=2, and the Lyman Series always result in an electron transmission from some quantum number n to principal quantum numer 1, n=1.