Page 1 of 1

orbitals vs. subshells

Posted: Wed Nov 06, 2019 12:04 pm
by nshahwan 1L
1D.19 How many orbitals are present in the (a) 4p-subshell; (b) 3d-subshell; (c) 1s-subshell; (d) 4f-subshell of an atom?
I just want to confirm if I have this right in my head:
subshells = 4f,3d,3p,1s,etc...
orbitals = number of spots to put the paired electrons in?

Re: orbitals vs. subshells

Posted: Wed Nov 06, 2019 12:27 pm
by Emily Chirila 2E
Yes, that is correct. In the sub-shell 4p, there is 3 orbitals (fitting 6e-, 2e- in each orbital). Sub-shell 3d has 5 orbitals (fits 10e-), Sub-shell 1s has one orbital (fits 2e-), and sub-shell 4f has 7 orbitals (fits 14e-).

So just remember:
Shell= n value (like 4)
Sub-Shell= a section of the shell (like 4s)
Orbital= a section within the sub-shell that holds individual pairs of e- (2 e- per orbital)

Re: orbitals vs. subshells

Posted: Wed Nov 06, 2019 12:34 pm
by 805394719
Subshells are 1s, 2p, ...
Orbitals are px, py, pz, dx, ...

So, for example, the px orbital can accommodate up to 2 electrons.

Each orbital can be occupied by a maximum of 2 electrons each with opposite spin.

For n = 2
There are 2 subshells (2s, 2p), and a total of four orbitals (one s, and 3 p orbitals)

Re: orbitals vs. subshells

Posted: Wed Nov 06, 2019 12:37 pm
by Omar Selim 1D
When thinking about what defines an orbital or subshell with respect to quantum numbers, Ml would refer to orbitals while L refers to the s, p, d. f,.. subshells.

Re: orbitals vs. subshells

Posted: Sat Dec 07, 2019 9:25 pm
by 105289321
Orbitals translate to one electron so therefore for s there are 2, p there are 6 and so on