Nodal Planes

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Bronson Mathos 1H
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Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:36 pm

Nodal Planes

Postby Bronson Mathos 1H » Sat Oct 31, 2020 1:35 am

Hi, would someone mind elaborating/explaining what nodal planes are and their involvement in quantum numbers?

Hannah Biju 1E
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Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:55 pm

Re: Nodal Planes

Postby Hannah Biju 1E » Sat Oct 31, 2020 2:36 am

A nodal plane is a plane in which the probability of finding an electron is zero. I don't think it has much to do with quantum numbers but it does have to do with bonding orientation. Say you have an electron in the Px state. If you wanted it to interact with another atom, they would have to interact on the x-axis. If the atom came from the z-axis the atoms would not bond because there is a nodal plane there meaning there are no electrons, so they are incapable of bonding on that plane.

Khoa Vu 3l
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Re: Nodal Planes

Postby Khoa Vu 3l » Sat Oct 31, 2020 4:41 pm

To add on to what Hannah said about nodal planes being where the probability of finding an electron is zero, if we look at Schrodinger's equation where Ψ is the wave function (either sine or cosine) and Ψ^2 is the equation to determine electron density distribution, we can see that in the latter's graph, its troughs (zeroes) represent the nodal planes because all values in the latter's equation (possibilities for finding an electron) are greater than zero since they are squared. As for their relation to quantum numbers, the only orbital that does not have a nodal plane is the s-orbital, giving it a symmetrical shape, so for all quantum numbers in which l=0, they would have a symmetrical shape.

David Y
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Re: Nodal Planes

Postby David Y » Sat Oct 31, 2020 5:41 pm

the s-orbital is an exception in this case I am pretty sure

Alen Huang 2G
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Re: Nodal Planes

Postby Alen Huang 2G » Sat Oct 31, 2020 10:46 pm

A nodal plane is just where theres a zero probability of finding an electron, if you think about the wave function the place where theres a node is on that nodal plane

Becca Nelson 3F
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Re: Nodal Planes

Postby Becca Nelson 3F » Sun Nov 01, 2020 9:18 am

A nodal plane is a region where the probability of finding an electron is 0. This has more to do with how bonding and atomic structure relate than just quantum numbers.

EmilyGillen_1A
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Re: Nodal Planes

Postby EmilyGillen_1A » Sun Nov 01, 2020 11:32 am

To add on to this, nodal planes are basically the "axes" of our diagrams for atoms. We rely on mathematical equations to visual what an atom looks like, and when we use those equations we get what are called "nodal planes", which are areas electrons have no mathematical chance of existing. With this blank space of existence, the nodal planes create a sort of "axis" where the atom reflects across but do not have any electrons present. There are multiple nodal planes - this enable us to visualize a 3D model of an atom.

Sarah Huang 3A
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Re: Nodal Planes

Postby Sarah Huang 3A » Sun Nov 01, 2020 11:39 am

I really liked how Khoa explained this, but yes, nodal planes are areas where there is a zero possibility of finding an electron. With Schrodinger's equation, it combines De Broglie's wave properties and Heisenberg's indeterminacy equation to describe a wave function. When psi(the triton symbol) is squared, it creates a wave with two peaks, and in between the peaks, there is that downward to upward slope, which is the trough (you can see it as a valley for analogy purposes). In that trough, it represent the zero possibility of finding an election while the peaks indicate the possibility of finding an electron.

Tae Pasawat 2A
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Re: Nodal Planes

Postby Tae Pasawat 2A » Sun Nov 01, 2020 7:16 pm

The way i visualize a plan is a flat piece of paper slicing through the diagram, creating cross-sectional areas with the electron cloud.

A nodal plane is where there is no probability of finding an electron, and this is where the different lobes are connected together at a node or central region.

Melanie Krahn 1C
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Re: Nodal Planes

Postby Melanie Krahn 1C » Sun Nov 01, 2020 7:19 pm

Where are nodal planes found and what are the possible exceptions?

Caelin Brenninkmeijer 1G
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Re: Nodal Planes

Postby Caelin Brenninkmeijer 1G » Sun Nov 01, 2020 7:22 pm

Melanie Krahn 1C wrote:Where are nodal planes found and what are the possible exceptions?

Nodal planes are regions where the probability of finding an electron is zero. Using Schrodinger's wave equation you're able to find where the planes are located.


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