Confusion with n, l, ml, ms.

Moderators: Chem_Mod, Chem_Admin

jonathanshi_1A
Posts: 22
Joined: Fri Jul 22, 2016 3:00 am

Confusion with n, l, ml, ms.

Postby jonathanshi_1A » Sat Dec 03, 2016 9:35 pm

On the midterm there was a question that asked how many elements have valence electrons with the quantum numbers n=2 and l=1. Looking on the table, there are 6 elements that fulfill that requirement; however, what if it said n=2 and l=0? Boron, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, fluorine, and neon all have valence electrons with those quantum numbers, so would the answer be 2 elements or 8 elements?

Helena Vervaet 1N
Posts: 26
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:59 pm

Re: Confusion with n, l, ml, ms.

Postby Helena Vervaet 1N » Sat Dec 03, 2016 10:36 pm

If the question states that n=2 and l=0, you would be looking at the s subshell of row 2. If we look at the periodic table, we can see that there are only 2 elements that fall in this specific subshell (lithium and beryllium) so your answer would then be 2.

Boron, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, fluorine, and neon are all from the 2p subshell, so they would have a quantum number of l=1 instead of l=0 (0 corresponds with s and 1 corresponds with p). I hope this helped!

Pauline Tze 3B
Posts: 57
Joined: Sat Jul 09, 2016 3:00 am
Been upvoted: 1 time

Re: Confusion with n, l, ml, ms.

Postby Pauline Tze 3B » Sat Dec 03, 2016 11:33 pm

Hello,

I'm also stuck on this concept. If it said n=2 and l=0, there's the possibility of boron, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, fluorine, and neon all have valence electrons with those quantum numbers because, for example, the valence electron configuration of Boron is [He]2s22p1. The 2s orbital would have l=0 as its quantum number, so doesn't that mean Boron (and the other 2p elements in that row) counts as one of the elements with n=2 l=0?

Thank you to anyone who can clarify this.


Return to “Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest