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1E.13

Posted: Mon Oct 29, 2018 10:56 pm
by Karina Koo 2H
I'm a bit confused on how to write the e- configuration of silver. I would think it's [Kr] 4d^9 5s^2 but according to the back of the 7th edition textbook, the answer is [Kr] 4d^10 5s^1. I'm noticing that this is kind of like the exceptions of copper and chromium mentioned in class, is this an exception as well? and if so, what other exceptions should I look out for?

Re: 1E.13

Posted: Mon Oct 29, 2018 11:28 pm
by Tuong Nguyen 2I
Yeah this would be another example of that exception in electron configurations. The transition metals from Copper and and Chromium take one electron from the 4s orbital to either have a half filled 3d orbital (in the case of Chromium) or a fully filled 3d orbital (in the case of silver).

Re: 1E.13

Posted: Tue Oct 30, 2018 4:17 pm
by Hailey Boehm 2H
Yes, I agree with what was previously said about this being another exception. In general, it is more favorable for electrons to fill an orbital (like 3d) than to pack 2 electrons into 4s because it costs less energy for this configuration. This is because a completely filled or 1/2 filled d subshell is more stable than a partially filled d subshell, so an e- from the 4s orbital will generally rise to the 3d orbital in this situation.

Re: 1E.13

Posted: Tue Oct 30, 2018 4:18 pm
by Mayaal_Khan_4H
Start removing electrons from the s-orbital because the d-orbital is best stable when it is half or full-filled.