Same spin

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Ghadir Seder 1G
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Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2019 12:17 am

Same spin

Postby Ghadir Seder 1G » Fri Oct 18, 2019 6:15 pm

What does it mean for an electron to have the "same spin?"

JOtomo1F
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Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:16 am
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Re: Same spin

Postby JOtomo1F » Fri Oct 18, 2019 11:30 pm

Electron spin is an unvarying number of either 1/2 or -1/2. The 1/2 spin applies to an "upward spin" of an electron and is represented in an electron configuration by an upward arrow. The -1/2 spin refers to the "downward spin" of an electron and is represented in an electron configuration by the downward area.

Louise Lin 2B
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Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Same spin

Postby Louise Lin 2B » Sat Oct 19, 2019 2:44 am

Adding on to the above comment, two electrons with the "same spin" means that they are both either spinning upward or spinning downward. Take the element carbon: the atomic number is 6, so the electron configuration would be 1s2 2s2 2p2. The 1s and 2s shells are both at the maximum occupancy, but the 2p shell only has 2 electrons. These two electrons would have the same spin.

Kurtis Liang 3I
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Re: Same spin

Postby Kurtis Liang 3I » Sat Oct 19, 2019 4:51 am

It's also helpful to note that all electrons will have the same spin until there is no room in the subshell and electrons must pair up (paired electrons have opposite spin). This is explained by Hund's rule.

Sanjana Borle 2K
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Joined: Fri Aug 09, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Same spin

Postby Sanjana Borle 2K » Sat Oct 19, 2019 12:33 pm

Same spin means that the electrons spin in the same direction (parallel to each other) and have the same quantum number (1/2 or -1/2). According to Hund's rule all electrons that are unpaired in an orbital will have the same, or parallel spin, but if there is more electrons and it requires pairing up, the pairs will spin in different directions.

Drake Choi_1I
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Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Same spin

Postby Drake Choi_1I » Sat Oct 19, 2019 12:42 pm

When drawing spin, is there a reason why only half of the arrow point is used?

Hailey Kim 4G
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Re: Same spin

Postby Hailey Kim 4G » Sat Oct 19, 2019 1:29 pm

Drake Choi_1I wrote:When drawing spin, is there a reason why only half of the arrow point is used?


I've seen it done both ways. In high school, I was taught to only draw half of the arrow point but Professor Lavelle draws the whole arrow point. I don't think it really matters as long as the arrow is pointing in the right direction.

Drake Choi_1I
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Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Same spin

Postby Drake Choi_1I » Sat Oct 26, 2019 1:14 pm

Thank you for the clarification! :)

Aprice_1J
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Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Same spin

Postby Aprice_1J » Sat Oct 26, 2019 11:18 pm

When would you see them have parallel spins? If they are more stable with different spins, what would constitute them having the same spin?

505306205
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Re: Same spin

Postby 505306205 » Sun Oct 27, 2019 12:00 am

Aprice_1J wrote:When would you see them have parallel spins? If they are more stable with different spins, what would constitute them having the same spin?


Electrons with the same spin cannot occupy the same orbital. Electrons singly occupy the different orbitals with parallel spins (Hund's Rule).

Jasmine Kim 1L
Posts: 71
Joined: Fri Aug 02, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Same spin

Postby Jasmine Kim 1L » Sun Oct 27, 2019 1:41 pm

Aprice_1J wrote:When would you see them have parallel spins? If they are more stable with different spins, what would constitute them having the same spin?

Elements such as carbon and nitrogen have parallel spins in the 2p subshell because it has multiple orbitals and electrons with parallel spins typically occupy different orbitals. You can see parallel spins in any subshell with multiple orbitals. I don't know if they have to always have the same spin, but I think they usually do because it is the most stable state for the atom.


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