isoelectronic

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Nina Fukui 2J
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isoelectronic

Postby Nina Fukui 2J » Mon Nov 23, 2020 11:17 pm

Hi everyone,
What does isoelectronic mean?

Tessa House 3A
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Re: isoelectronic

Postby Tessa House 3A » Mon Nov 23, 2020 11:20 pm

Hi,
Isoelectronic means having the same number of electrons. For example, a cation may have the same number of electrons and be isoelectronic to another element because it has lost electrons.

Nane Onanyan 1G
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Re: isoelectronic

Postby Nane Onanyan 1G » Mon Nov 23, 2020 11:20 pm

Isoelectronic is used to describe atoms and ions with the same number of electrons
For example Na+ and Mg2+

Shalyn Kelly 3H
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Re: isoelectronic

Postby Shalyn Kelly 3H » Mon Nov 23, 2020 11:53 pm

Hi, follow up question. What does it do for the elements to be isoelectronic? Do they act similarly? Or does it affect them in other ways?

Shruti Kulkarni 2I
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Re: isoelectronic

Postby Shruti Kulkarni 2I » Tue Nov 24, 2020 12:12 am

Hi! Isoelectronic means that the atoms have the same amount of electrons. For example, O2-, F1- and Ne are isoelectric as they all have 10 electrons. From my understanding, isoelectronic atoms share similar properties, so knowing that they are isoelectronic can help you in understanding the properties of an unknown atom.

Katie Le 3K
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Re: isoelectronic

Postby Katie Le 3K » Tue Nov 24, 2020 1:18 am

Isoelectronic means that two things have the same amount of electrons. An example would be that Ag 3+ and Mg 2+ are isoelectronic.

Rose_Malki_3G
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Re: isoelectronic

Postby Rose_Malki_3G » Tue Nov 24, 2020 1:40 am

If two species are isoelectronic, it means they have the same number of electrons. However, the two species will still have different properties as their nuclear charges are different.

Yashvi Reddy 1H
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Re: isoelectronic

Postby Yashvi Reddy 1H » Tue Nov 24, 2020 9:32 am

Hi! Great question! To my understanding, isoelectronic means the same number of electrons (but doesn’t always mean same characteristics). I hope this helps! Good luck.

Kimiya Aframian IB
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Re: isoelectronic

Postby Kimiya Aframian IB » Tue Nov 24, 2020 9:33 am

nina fukui 1G wrote:Hi everyone,
What does isoelectronic mean?

Hi! Isoelectronic means that the two entities (ie. atoms, ions, molecules, etc.) have the same number of electrons. This does not mean they have the same characteristics or the same charge. Hope this helps!

Maaria Abdel-Moneim 2G
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Re: isoelectronic

Postby Maaria Abdel-Moneim 2G » Tue Nov 24, 2020 10:35 am

Isoelectronic is when two atoms/ions have the same number of electrons. For example Ar and Ca2+ have the same number of electrons because Ca lost two electrons making it have 18 electrons exactly like Ar.

Crystal Hsueh 2L
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Re: isoelectronic

Postby Crystal Hsueh 2L » Tue Nov 24, 2020 5:30 pm

Isoelectronic means having the same number of electrons. For example, Ne and O2- have the same number of electrons even though they have a different number of protons.

105618850
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Re: isoelectronic

Postby 105618850 » Sun Nov 29, 2020 2:20 am

Isoelectronic is simply a term used to describe atoms with the same amount of electrons.

Selena Quispe 2I
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Re: isoelectronic

Postby Selena Quispe 2I » Sun Nov 29, 2020 2:58 am

Isoelectronic is when atoms and ions have the same number of electrons. However, this does not imply they have the same chemical or physical properties because they have different nuclear charges. I hope this helps!!


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