Ionization Energy

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Catherine Trinh 3K
Posts: 10
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:56 pm

Ionization Energy

Postby Catherine Trinh 3K » Fri Oct 14, 2016 5:43 pm

I know that ionizatino energy is the energy needed to remove an electron from an atom. However, how does an element have multiple ionization energies? Does it depend on the charge of the element?

Emma_Green_2C
Posts: 21
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:57 pm

Re: Ionization Energy

Postby Emma_Green_2C » Fri Oct 14, 2016 7:42 pm

An element has multiple ionization energies in the sense that the first ionization energy is the energy it takes to remove the outermost electron (ex. from Na to Na+). Then the second ionization energy is the energy it takes to remove another electron (Na+ to Na^2+), the third ionization energy is the energy it takes to remove yet another electron (Na^2+ to Na^3+), etc. It takes more and more energy to remove each electron. The charge does matter because it takes more energy to remove an electron from a positively charged ion than from a neutral atom (when Na loses an electron it has a full outer shell). This explains why the second ionization energy of sodium is larger than the first ionization energy.


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