Why is the second ionization energy of an atom always higher than its first ionization energy?  [ENDORSED]

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Yinhan_Liu_1D
Posts: 51
Joined: Sat Sep 24, 2016 3:00 am

Why is the second ionization energy of an atom always higher than its first ionization energy?

Postby Yinhan_Liu_1D » Thu Oct 20, 2016 7:59 pm

It's in the thinking point on P54.

I would appreciate your help.

Yinhan_Liu_1D
Posts: 51
Joined: Sat Sep 24, 2016 3:00 am

Re: Why is the second ionization energy of an atom always higher than its first ionization energy?

Postby Yinhan_Liu_1D » Thu Oct 20, 2016 8:16 pm

LOL... I think I get it.
The ionization here happens mostly within the first two groups.

In the first group, when the first ion is removed, we have to remove one ion from the core noble gas, which would be very hard, because it's already a stable formation.

janavi_patel_2K
Posts: 20
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:59 pm

Re: Why is the second ionization energy of an atom always higher than its first ionization energy?  [ENDORSED]

Postby janavi_patel_2K » Thu Oct 20, 2016 8:18 pm

I believe that this is because removing the second electron is always harder than removing the first electron. Once the first electron is removed, the electrostatic attraction energy increases and there is a net positive charge because one electron with a negative charge has already been removed. It takes much more energy to remove an electron from a positively charged ion than from a neutral atom.


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