Electron Affinity

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Hellen Truong 2J
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Electron Affinity

Postby Hellen Truong 2J » Mon Oct 30, 2017 2:48 pm

How do we remember the trend for electron affinity if it doesn't really seem to follow the periodic table? For example, I know that higher electron affinities are usually toward the top right of the table, but chlorine and fluorine already contradict that.

Maeve Gallagher 1J
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Re: Electron Affinity

Postby Maeve Gallagher 1J » Mon Oct 30, 2017 4:41 pm

Electron affinity does follow the periodic table! Electron affinity increases as you move left to right and increases as you go up. Flourine, being in the top right, has the highest electron affinity of any element.

Alissa Stanley 3G
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Re: Electron Affinity

Postby Alissa Stanley 3G » Tue Oct 31, 2017 12:46 am

#67 in Chapter 2 asks which element has the higher electron affinity. Part b asks you to compare nitrogen and carbon. I thought the answer would be nitrogen because nitrogen is more towards the right of the periodic table (I believe that electron affinity is higher towards the top right of the periodic table), but the answer says it is carbon. Can someone explain why this is?

Alex Nechaev 1I
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Re: Electron Affinity

Postby Alex Nechaev 1I » Thu Nov 02, 2017 12:51 pm

Alissa Stanley 3G wrote:#67 in Chapter 2 asks which element has the higher electron affinity. Part b asks you to compare nitrogen and carbon. I thought the answer would be nitrogen because nitrogen is more towards the right of the periodic table (I believe that electron affinity is higher towards the top right of the periodic table), but the answer says it is carbon. Can someone explain why this is?

From my understanding, this is because carbon has four valence electrons, meaning that it has one electron in each orbital. If you picture the Lewis structures that we draw in class, you can imagine that there are four electrons equally spaced around the carbon atom, meaning it is more stable. Nitrogen, on the other hand, has 5 valence electrons meaning it has 1 pair of electrons and 3 unpaired electrons. This means that it is unbalanced and may have a harder time keeping that 5th electron. Carbon has a higher electron affinity because it will be easier to keep those four unpaired electrons than it will for Nitrogen to keep that extra 5th one. Hope this helped!

Mirrat
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Re: Electron Affinity

Postby Mirrat » Sun Nov 05, 2017 4:25 pm

What's the relationship between electron affinity and electronegativity?


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