Determining Smaller First Ionization Energy

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FizaBaloch1J
Posts: 41
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:01 am

Determining Smaller First Ionization Energy

Postby FizaBaloch1J » Sat May 05, 2018 8:54 pm

Which member of each pair has the smaller first ionization energy: (a) Ca or Mg; (b) Mg or Na; (c) Al or Na?

Is this determined by simply looking at the ionization trends? Which is that ionization energy decreases down a group, and increases across a period, so for ...

a) because Ca is below Mg, Calcium has a smaller first ionization energy?
b) because Na is to the left of Mg, it has a smaller first ionization energy?
c) because Na is again to the left of Al, it has a smaller first ionization energy?

What does "first ionization energy" exactly mean, is it the same as "ionization energy?"

KC Navarro_1H
Posts: 33
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:04 am

Re: Determining Smaller First Ionization Energy

Postby KC Navarro_1H » Sat May 05, 2018 9:17 pm

First ionization energy refers to the amount of energy required to remove one electron; ionization energy itself just refers to the amount of energy to remove an electron, so it’s not totally different. However, as you remove more electrons, the second ionization energy becomes higher because it’s harder to remove an electron a second time and even harder to remove an electron a third, fourth, etc.. The reason why ionization energy increases across a period is because the electrons are held more tightly by the nucleus and want to gain electrons to fill all their shells by gaining more electrons instead of having them removed. As you go down a group, valence electrons are further away from the nucleus, and they’re easier to remove, thus having lower ionization energy. I hope this helps! (And your answers are correct)


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