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2.67 part C (electron affinity)

Posted: Sat May 05, 2018 9:20 pm
by FizaBaloch1J
Which element of each of the following pairs has the higher electron affinity: (a) oxygen or fluorine; (b) nitrogen or carbon; (c) chlorine or bromine; (d) lithium or sodium?

Are the trends for electron affinity the same as ionization energy? Decreases down a group, increases across a period (from left to right)?

So for part b) if Nitrogen is to the right of Carbon wouldn't that have a higher electron affinity? but the answer says carbon has a higher electron affinity.

Help please. I don't get this!

Re: 2.67 part C (electron affinity)

Posted: Sat May 05, 2018 9:23 pm
by Emma Leshan 1B
I was wondering this too, so I looked it up. Apparently, a half-filled p subshell is more stable than one with only 2 electrons, so this is why carbon has a higher electron affinity than nitrogen.

Re: 2.67 part C (electron affinity)

Posted: Sun May 06, 2018 5:10 pm
by AshleyLamba1H
I am confused about this too, does anyone know which page in the textbook electron affinity is addressed? I can't seem to find it

Re: 2.67 part C (electron affinity)

Posted: Sun May 06, 2018 7:18 pm
by Harmonie Ahuna-1C
I was also confused about this problem but electron affinity is discussed in section 2.11 on pages 56-57. Though the general trend is that electron affinities are highest toward the right of the periodic table, figure 2.28 indicates that nitrogen is relatively more stable than carbon. It shows the electron affinity of nitrogen is actually negative, making it less than carbon's which is positive. Also, as was previously mentioned a half filled p subshell is more stable which is why carbon is more likely to gain an electron.