electron affinity  [ENDORSED]

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nikitasridhar_1b
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electron affinity

Postby nikitasridhar_1b » Tue May 08, 2018 5:08 pm

does electron affinity measure the energy required to gain an electron or the attraction to an electron? for example an element far right on the periodic table would hav a high nuclear charge, and it would be easy to add an electron. does this mean the electron affinity is high (because the attraction is high) or it is low (the energy required to add the electron is low)

Alicia Yu 1A
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Re: electron affinity

Postby Alicia Yu 1A » Tue May 08, 2018 7:58 pm

The electron's affinity measures the energy given off when one mole of atoms in the gaseous state each takes in one (or more) electrons to become a mole of anions in the gaseous state, or basically the energy required to gain an electron to become an anion.
That being said, the nuclear charge of an electron measures the pull that the nucleus has on these electrons (positive & negative charge), and relates to the increase in atomic number - which is an increase in the protons in the nucleus that attracts electrons more. When you go across a period of the periodic table, atomic number increases, but electrons are being added to the same energy level.
This means that an incoming electron will be more attracted to the nucleus, which implies that the energy gain when it is added to the atom will be more significant
therefore,
electron affinity increases.

Faisal Alshamaa - 1L
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Re: electron affinity

Postby Faisal Alshamaa - 1L » Thu May 10, 2018 6:43 pm

Electron affinity is the energy released when an electron is added, so it makes sense when we think about its trend on the periodic table. The energy released when an electron is added increases across a period because elements are always trying to reach the most stable configuration. They want to be like the cool kids, or Noble gases, and that is why energy is released when you add an electron to something like Fluorine and cause it to reach that much more stable and lower energy state. It makes sense that little energy would be released to an element like Sodium, since it wants to lose an electron really badly and instead gets an electron.

Gisselle Sainz 2F
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Re: electron affinity

Postby Gisselle Sainz 2F » Fri May 11, 2018 11:36 pm

I believe electron affinity is the amount of energy released or used when an electron is added to an atom.

Valeria Viera 1B
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Re: electron affinity

Postby Valeria Viera 1B » Fri May 11, 2018 11:44 pm

The way a UA described it to me was that electronegativity is the ability of a neutral atom to attract electrons towards itself and electron affinity is the energy released when the electron is added to the neutral atom (kind of like a cause and effect I think) hope this helps

Amir Akhavan 1E
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Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:01 am

Re: electron affinity

Postby Amir Akhavan 1E » Sun May 13, 2018 2:04 pm

Electron affinity is the amount of energy released when an electron is gained. Another way of saying this would be how bad the element wants to gain an electron.

Mariah Guerrero 1J
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Re: electron affinity

Postby Mariah Guerrero 1J » Sun May 13, 2018 4:31 pm

Can someone explain the difference between electron affinity and electron negativity again? I understand that both properties have the same periodic trend. Is there an easier way that I can remember the difference?

Chem_Mod
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Re: electron affinity

Postby Chem_Mod » Sun May 13, 2018 10:45 pm

electron affinity is an energy. Electronegativity is a relative scale

Shione Nakahara 1F
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Re: electron affinity

Postby Shione Nakahara 1F » Sun May 13, 2018 11:18 pm

A lower electron affinity indicates that an atom does not accept electrons as easily.

JoeyAnn Mateo 1D
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Re: electron affinity

Postby JoeyAnn Mateo 1D » Mon May 14, 2018 2:00 pm

Fluorine is the most electronegative

Chem_Mod
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Re: electron affinity  [ENDORSED]

Postby Chem_Mod » Mon May 14, 2018 3:20 pm

Electronegativity represents how much the atom "wants" an electron. Electron affinity is a specific measurement of the energy released when adding an electron.

mayra martinez 1D
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:17 am

Re: electron affinity

Postby mayra martinez 1D » Thu Oct 11, 2018 10:25 pm

Electron affinity is the energy released when an electron is added to a neutral atom in order to form a negative ion. Electron affinity increases as you go up the periodic table and from left to right to the periodic table. This is because the electrons added to the energy levels get closer to the nucleus.

Riya Shah 4H
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Joined: Wed May 02, 2018 3:00 am

Re: electron affinity

Postby Riya Shah 4H » Fri Oct 12, 2018 4:53 pm

If electron affinity is negative then does that mean that the atom accepts electron easily and vice-versa meaning if electron affinity is positive the atom has difficulty accepting an electron?

804994652
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Re: electron affinity

Postby 804994652 » Sat Oct 13, 2018 8:48 pm

As a side note, the general trend for electron affinity is that it increase upwards and from left to right of the periodic table.

Andrew Lam 3B
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Re: electron affinity

Postby Andrew Lam 3B » Sat Oct 13, 2018 8:52 pm

Atoms with low electron affinity (i.e. alkali metals) lose electrons far more easily to have a full valence shell whereas it is far easier for a halogen (say Fluorine) to pick up an electron and fill its valence shell. Thus, we say halogens have a high electron affinity.

Carlos De La Torre 2L
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Re: electron affinity

Postby Carlos De La Torre 2L » Sun Oct 21, 2018 11:31 pm

Florine is the most electronegative atom, using that fact you can establish a variety of periodic trends from the table, as you move from left to right on a period all subshells become smaller ever so slightly due to the increase in protons, and as you move from top to bottom the radius increases by an entire subshell, so we can establish fluorine also has the highest ratio for protons to radius making it the most electronegative


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