Relationship between Ionic Radius, Atomic RdiuIonization Enrgy, Electron Affinity

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Melissa_Aguirre1J
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Relationship between Ionic Radius, Atomic RdiuIonization Enrgy, Electron Affinity

Postby Melissa_Aguirre1J » Thu May 10, 2018 10:07 am

What is the relationship between atomic radius, ionic radius, ionization energy, and electron affinity? Are atomic and ionic radius related and going in the same direction and ionization energy and electron affinity related and going in the same direction?

Faisal Alshamaa - 1L
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Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:01 am

Re: Relationship between Ionic Radius, Atomic RdiuIonization Enrgy, Electron Affinity

Postby Faisal Alshamaa - 1L » Thu May 10, 2018 11:52 am

They are all related and intertwined as part of the explanation for the trends in the periodic table. Yes, ionic and atomic radius follow the same trend (increases down a group and decreases across) while electron affinity and ionization energy follow the opposite trend (increases across and decreases down a group). I think you should read how they are each different from each other in the textbook though.

Alexander Hari 1L
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Joined: Wed Feb 14, 2018 3:02 am

Re: Relationship between Ionic Radius, Atomic RdiuIonization Enrgy, Electron Affinity

Postby Alexander Hari 1L » Thu May 10, 2018 2:56 pm

You can think of ionization energy and electron affinity as kind of opposites. Ionization energy is the amount of energy required to remove an electron while electron affinity is the energy required to add an electron. It might be helpful to remember the difference by thinking of affinity as something you are good at which would be positive, and therefore adding electrons while ionization energy would be the opposite. Hope that helped!

Beverly Shih 1K
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Re: Relationship between Ionic Radius, Atomic RdiuIonization Enrgy, Electron Affinity

Postby Beverly Shih 1K » Thu May 10, 2018 3:04 pm

It's also important to remember that these are trends, not rules, so there are several exceptions that may break the patterns between them. For example, boron is to the right of beryllium in the periodic table, so its electron affinity is bigger but its ionization energy is smaller instead of larger as would be expected by the trends. So it's always safer to draw out electron configurations when determining if an element follows each trend.


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